The Serial Killers PDF ´ The Serial ePUB Ì

The Serial Killers PDF ´ The Serial  ePUB Ì
    IGNOU books 2019 In Hindi Online PDF Free the methods of tracking these elusive killers have been revolutionised."/>
  • Paperback
  • 349 pages
  • The Serial Killers
  • Colin Wilson
  • English
  • 01 November 2018
  • 9780863696152

The Serial Killers❮Reading❯ ➽ The Serial Killers Author Colin Wilson – Essayreview.co.uk An ordinary family house in a quiet West Country town 25 Cromwell Street, Glouster Now known throughout the world as the House of Horror The home of Fred and Rosemary West and the scene of one of the An ordinary family house in a quiet West Country town Cromwell Street, Glouster Now known throughout the world as the House of Horror The home of Fred and Rosemary West and the scene of one of the most shocking cases of serial murder England has ever seen United by acts of unimaginable cruelty, The Serial ePUB Ì the West s partnership was one of the most deadly in criminal historyAnd serial killers are increasing Triggered by either sexual fantasies or a need to infilct pain and fear, their sadistic addiction to frenzied killing is the most horrifying of all crimesBut with the fromation of the world s first National Centre for the Analysis of Violent Crime in Virginia, made famous in the hugely popular Silence of the Lambs, the methods of tracking these elusive killers have been revolutionised.


About the Author: Colin Wilson

Librarian Note There is than one author by this name in the Goodreads databaseColin Henry Wilson was born and raised in Leicester, England, UK He left school at , worked in factories and various occupations, and read in his spare time When Wilson was , Gollancz published The Outsider which examines the role The Serial ePUB Ì of the social outsider in seminal works of various key literary and.


10 thoughts on “The Serial Killers

  1. says:

    I usually worry about my lapses of short term memory but here it comes as something of a relief that I can t retain in my addled little brain all the horrors Colin Wilson catalogues here The impression I m left with is of a worthwhile read which shows similarities and differences between the various types of killer from the 19th to the 21st century and the reasons, such as they are, behind their atrocities The psychology explored by the author gives purpose to his writing and helps me to make sense of the pointlessness of randomly destroying human life.The sudden ending suggested that the author was in a hurry to finish it Perhaps he d had than enough by the time he reached that point.

  2. says:

    This book is not worth the time it took to read it.There is plenty of gory detail, for fans of that sort of thing But the book jumps from topic to topic with no perceptible logical structure And the author makes sweeping generalization without a scrap of evidence to back them up For example, he announces that political radicals have the same motivation for their actions as serial killers.But worst of all are the errors in basic factual information He states that Ted Bundy almost always drove stolen cars, when in fact Bundy used his carefully modified VW beetle through the most prolific part of his murderous career And he does not even get the correct identities of the Manson Family defendants in the Tate LaBianca murder trial My verdict The author is guilty of throwing together a bunch of misinformation and unsupported theorizing in order to make a quick buck

  3. says:

    The book referrs to most of the well known serial killers and it does not spare the usual gory descriptions It also has a few smart referrences as I would call them , to Abraham Maslow, William James, Auguste de Villiers de I sle Adam and others However, there are some referrences that made me dislike the book because they are sending it straight into the mud of pseudoscience paranormal First off, the author seems to endorse the idea of demonic posession in the case of a certain killer Second, it seems to support the theory of Rupert Sheldrake regarding morphic resonance the final chapter could have been so much better without running into this laughable woo woo.

  4. says:

    Colin Wilson is an author whose books I always take with a grain of salt because his writing is in most cases outdated and or, riddled with contradicting statements and overall not very scientific For reference, he has written a lot about paranormal phenomena which he verifies with questionable methods such as pseudo science, personal or other people s anecdotes and by connecting dots that just aren t there or can t be connected Relevant to this book or his interest in serial killers may also be that he wrote a foreword there are two, the other one by Sondra London to SK Danny Rolling s auto biography, The Making of a Serial Killer The Real Story of the Gainesville Student Murders in the Killer s Own Words In it he supports Rolling s claims of demon possession and talks in great detail about the unseen and evil forces that possess otherwise good people to become killers Yeah Satanic Panic par excellence, no thank you and good day In this book mainly in the acknowledgements he makes references to agents and law enforcement having helped him understand serial killers, their MO and psyche but frankly, he doesn t understand very much about any of it Just like with people like Helen Morrison or Richard Duffus he appears to want to stand out with his opinions, theories and analyses and while True Crime is a very competitive business as it pertains to writing books and attracting readers to this most complex subject matter, wanting to be special and different for the sake of it is simply not a good call One thing that I will give him is that when his book came out the criteria for serial killing was to have had killed at least three people In 2017 this was reduced to two So he classifies Gary Heidnik as a non serial killer while still mentioning him in the book The first sentence of chapter one starts out explaining that serial killing is a new phenomenon and that is already where the author errs Serial killings have been recorded since 5 BC actually and it is safe to say that long before anything was written about them or they were recognized as serial killers they still existed Well, not to draw this out unnecessarily, but the book pretty much continues in this vein, and halfway through I found I could hardly bear it any, prompting me to skip pages and ultimately put it in my dnf pile.

  5. says:

    Crime is near to us And we are living ordinary world, however psychopath destroys easily To know real crime and understand why they did such things is very important for us.

  6. says:

    this book is undoubtedly a good introduction to the understanding of the mind of a serial killer, but i do have a couple of criticisms firstly, the book spends too much time on the less interesting topics within it, namely the profiling section, and not enough on the actual psychology of the killers themselves.secondly, the structure of the cases can sometimes jump around too much and leave the reader confused and unable to coherently follow the events, as their order is not clear.thirdly, there was a lot of repetition of cases within different chapters, which is okay as a small reference, but when details that have already been divulged a chapter earlier are being presented again in similar detail, it is slightly irritating and feels as if the author is simply attempting to increase the length of the book.overall though, a good introduction to the topic, and one that i would recommend to anyone taking their first steps into the world of true crime, just as i was.

  7. says:

    One of the most horrific books I have read read with discretion

  8. says:

    So, where to start There s nothing inherently bad about this book, except for the fact that it is Most of it, especially the first few stories of serial killers, feel as though they were written by high schoolers for their final essay The chapters are riddled with grammar, punctuation and occasionally even spelling errors, which makes me wonder just what sort of editing process it was put through Some of the chapters are also just based on myths, which makes me wonder what the point was.The quality of the chapters improved slightly, but only just Certain chapters were interesting and insightful, but a lot of it appears to be what the authors could find off the internet Further, the killers are localised to the UK and US only not a very international perspective.Dull and disappointing.

  9. says:

    A fascinating account of the history of sex crime and the explosion of the serial killer in the late 20th Century which eventually led to the breakthrough of profiling in Quantico, Virginia painstakingly drawing clues from seemingly clean scenes , and finally getting some sort of handle on what appear, on the surface, to be unsolvable crimes And what debauched crimes they are Cameron Hooker taking a severed head into a shower, in particular, is one of those moments when you realise truth really is stranger, and infinitely disturbing, than fiction Feeling a little jaded Read this, see how you feel after you ve finished.

  10. says:

    The book referrs to most of the well known serial killers and it does not spare the usual gory descriptions It also has a few smart referrences as I would call them , to Abraham Maslow, William James, Auguste de Villiers de I sle Adam and others However, there are some referrences that made me dislike the book because they are sending it straight into the mud of pseudoscience paranormal First off, the author seems to endorse the idea of demonic posession in the case of a certain killer Second, it seems to support the theory of Rupert Sheldrake regarding morphic resonance the final chapter could have been so much better without running into this laughable woo woo.

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