Paperback ☆ The African PDF/EPUB Á

Paperback  ☆ The African PDF/EPUB Á
  • Paperback
  • 311 pages
  • The African
  • Harold Courlander
  • English
  • 14 June 2017
  • 080503000X

The African❰BOOKS❯ ✭ The African Author Harold Courlander – Essayreview.co.uk Before Alex Hailey s Roots there was Courlander s The African, which chronicles the experiences of a young African boy, Hwesuhunu, who is kidnapped from his homeland His story recreates the horrors of Before Alex Hailey s Roots there was Courlander s The African, which chronicles the experiences of a young African boy, Hwesuhunu, who is kidnapped from his homeland His story recreates the horrors of the Middle Passage and the degradation of slavery.


About the Author: Harold Courlander

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The African book, this is one of the most wanted Harold Courlander author readers around the world.


10 thoughts on “The African

  1. says:

    Just to get this out of the way YES Alex Haley plagiarized from this when writing Roots Courlander took him to court and, though Haley initially huffed it was all nonsense, Haley actually settled and issued one final concession Alex Haley acknowledges and regrets that various materials from The African by Harold Courlander found their way into his book Roots Through magic, one assumes The most galling part is that not only is Courlander s book shorter than Haley s, but Courlander Just to get this out of the way YES Alex Haley plagiarized from this when writing Roots Courlander took him to court and, though Haley initially huffed it was all nonsense, Haley actually settled and issued one final concession Alex Haley acknowledges and regrets that various materials from The African by Harold Courlander found their way into his book Roots Through magic, one assumes The most galling part is that not only is Courlander s book shorter than Haley s, but Courlander s book is BY FAR the better one Aside from being better written, better researched better paced, it humanizes and demonstrates the religious, ethnic, ideological, cultural and individual diversity of Africans and Black Americans while Haley seems so dedicated to presenting his supposed ancestors as suffering saints that he strips them of all agency, personality, individuality or vitality If there were any justice in the world of literature, Courlander s would be the book recommended to grade school kids rather than Haley s fraud

  2. says:

    This is the book that was said that Alex Haley plagiarized He may have at the very beginning, but there are things in Alex Haley s book that makes his fiction superior There are no people captured in The African who know who Jesus was, can read or write Many Africans who were captured and who were Jewish, Christian, or Muslim could read, write, or recite Holy writings from memory Many were multilingual I liked The African s direction in the Native American culture I was surprised that he This is the book that was said that Alex Haley plagiarized He may have at the very beginning, but there are things in Alex Haley s book that makes his fiction superior There are no people captured in The African who know who Jesus was, can read or write Many Africans who were captured and who were Jewish, Christian, or Muslim could read, write, or recite Holy writings from memory Many were multilingual I liked The African s direction in the Native American culture I was surprised that he knew the name of the people my ancestors were from and did not only use the common American name of Creek The story is pretty good But, I have another problem He states, in 1993, that he had not read anything about the African experience from Africa to America I find this hard to believe There was an author who wrote a fictional series on an African experience from Africa to America This author was so well known that several of his books were made into movies The name of the author is Frank Yerby and his fictional account started with The Dahomean and ended with A Darkness at Ingraham s Crest There were also slave accounts of the start in Africa to America One very famous one was not a fiction and was given to us by Olaudah Equiano I can see both literature in The African The book is a good read for those who have no knowledge of the African history of Christian, Jews, and Muslims being traded into slavery The best thing about this book is the introduction of diverse Black characters, good guys and bad guys

  3. says:

    From the very first words I knew that Alex plagiarized but here s the thing, Harold actually STUDIED African Haitian Caribbean History he took many trips and actually did the work I loved this book from beginning to end and really did not want it to end In some ways, I feel as if HC embodied The African and perhaps lived off the land for some time to get the most appropriate words to use in this beautiful novel I love how the Indians were incorporated and that while there is no happy end From the very first words I knew that Alex plagiarized but here s the thing, Harold actually STUDIED African Haitian Caribbean History he took many trips and actually did the work I loved this book from beginning to end and really did not want it to end In some ways, I feel as if HC embodied The African and perhaps lived off the land for some time to get the most appropriate words to use in this beautiful novel I love how the Indians were incorporated and that while there is no happy ending there is also no sad ending There were times I wanted to cry and times I wanted to cheer I hope Wes made it and never once did he have to step on anyone to get anywhere I m tripping though cause white people actually thought they had done everyone a favor GirlGoodbye Cause guess what, African Americans, Africans and Indians are out here flourishing despite what was forced upon us GREATNESSeasy

  4. says:

    Courlander was an ethnomusicologist who traded reel to reel tapes with people from all over the world He adapted to what he d learned from from histories on either side of the Middle Passage and turned it into a novel written in the style that one lives one s life not quite knowing what will happen next The result is an awesome portrait of man s passage through slavery and explores the corners of the American South and lesser known phenomena of a people on the brink of semi emancipation R Courlander was an ethnomusicologist who traded reel to reel tapes with people from all over the world He adapted to what he d learned from from histories on either side of the Middle Passage and turned it into a novel written in the style that one lives one s life not quite knowing what will happen next The result is an awesome portrait of man s passage through slavery and explores the corners of the American South and lesser known phenomena of a people on the brink of semi emancipation Read Courlander s book and track down his LPs to discover a person s passion for sharing the secret stories of human beings the world over

  5. says:

    Well Worth ReadingWhether you ve read Roots or not, The African was a beautiful novel I discovered it when I decided to read Roots for my Journey Around the World in 80 Books for 2019 I read The African so I could compare the two works The two books have very little comparisons between them I waited to review this until I had finished all of Roots so I could fairly judge both in my own mind Afterwards, I feel as if I discovered a new great read accidentally I recommend Mr Courlander s boo Well Worth ReadingWhether you ve read Roots or not, The African was a beautiful novel I discovered it when I decided to read Roots for my Journey Around the World in 80 Books for 2019 I read The African so I could compare the two works The two books have very little comparisons between them I waited to review this until I had finished all of Roots so I could fairly judge both in my own mind Afterwards, I feel as if I discovered a new great read accidentally I recommend Mr Courlander s book for anyone interested in Africa or slavery But, I also suggest the reading of Roots, for those interested in comparing the two They both reveal much about the time period they share

  6. says:

    another really good book from my sociology of the inner city child class the author of this book sued alex haley the author of roots for stealing his idea and won there are definitely some eerily similar experiences in both books.

  7. says:

    what can i do to read this book help me please

  8. says:

    It is really unfair that this book has been forgotten while Roots has received such acclaim This book is a beautiful, compelling saga of Africans enslaved and sent across the ocean, detailing each part of the life of the main character, Hwesuhunu, from boyhood in Africa to the voyage over to his time on the plantations and ultimately his bid for freedom Strongly recommended.

  9. says:

    It s Similar To Roots

  10. says:

    So, just to get this out of the way, the author of this book, Harold Courlander, sued Alex Haley, saying that Haley ripped off some parts of Roots from this book And Courlander won So there s that It s pretty much just the part on the slave ship, though, not the whole story or anything.Anyway.This is an interesting story, and I m going to compare it to Roots because I can t help it The main difference is that this is just the story of one man, rather than a family history But the dude does So, just to get this out of the way, the author of this book, Harold Courlander, sued Alex Haley, saying that Haley ripped off some parts of Roots from this book And Courlander won So there s that It s pretty much just the part on the slave ship, though, not the whole story or anything.Anyway.This is an interesting story, and I m going to compare it to Roots because I can t help it The main difference is that this is just the story of one man, rather than a family history But the dude does have a few different experiences that I ve never read about before, like being in a couple of independent black communities in America, one on St Croix I think and one off the coast ofGeorgia I think He was also a guest of a Native American village for a while I forget which tribe So that was cool But there sI dunno It didn t make me FEEL like Roots did, even if we re only talking about Kunta Kinte the African of that book Courlander doesn t spend enough time describing Wes s life in Africa and he was only twelve when he was stolen so it s hard to feel the Africanness of Wes after he s in America I mean we re told of it, but I didn t FEEL it, I didn t feel that sense of loss and of out of placeness and despair It s a nice, interesting story, and things that happened were sad and terrible sometimes, but I don t know that I was ever moved to tears, and I am pretty good at being moved to tears by sad books I just never felt like I really knew Wes If someone was like should I read this book It sounds interesting I would probably say sure but I would never go to someone and say you know what you should check out You should read The African Whereas I think everyone in America should read Roots For perspective And it s not a perfect book But it s important, and it makes you feel what it s like to be a black slave in southern America In The African you re just reading about it

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