The Marriage Game PDF/EPUB ´ The Marriage Kindle -

The Marriage Game PDF/EPUB ´ The Marriage  Kindle -
    The Marriage Game PDF/EPUB ´ The Marriage Kindle - rumours that Elizabeth is no virgin at allThe formidable young Queen is regarded by most of Christendom as a bastard, a heretic and a usurper, yet many princes covet Tudor England and seek her hand in marriage Under mounting pressure to take a husband, Elizabeth encourages their advances without ever committing a delicate, politically fraught balancing act which becomes known as The Marriage Game But treading this dangerous line with Robert Dudley, the son and grandson of traitors, could cost her the throne Played out amidst the splendour of the Tudor court and the most famous events of a great age, The Marriage Game is a dramatic, complex and deeply poignant tale of intrigue, love and loss At its heart is our greatest Queen and the emotional truth of one of history s most extraordinary love affairs."/>
  • Paperback
  • 432 pages
  • The Marriage Game
  • Alison Weir
  • English
  • 27 February 2019
  • 0091930863

The Marriage Game[PDF / Epub] ☆ The Marriage Game By Alison Weir – Essayreview.co.uk Bestselling historian Alison Weir brings all her knowledge of Elizabeth I to vivid life in a novel of intrigue, sex, plots, mysteries and tragedies, amid all the colour and pageantry of the Tudor cour Bestselling historian Alison Weir brings all her knowledge of Elizabeth I to vivid life in a novel of intrigue, sex, plots, mysteries and The Marriage Kindle - tragedies, amid all the colour and pageantry of the Tudor courtTheir affair is the scandal of Europe Queen Elizabeth presents herself as the Virgin Queen but cannot resist her dashing but married Master of Horse, Lord Robert Dudley Many believe them to be lovers, and there are scurrilous rumours that Elizabeth is no virgin at allThe formidable young Queen is regarded by most of Christendom as a bastard, a heretic and a usurper, yet many princes covet Tudor England and seek her hand in marriage Under mounting pressure to take a husband, Elizabeth encourages their advances without ever committing a delicate, politically fraught balancing act which becomes known as The Marriage Game But treading this dangerous line with Robert Dudley, the son and grandson of traitors, could cost her the throne Played out amidst the splendour of the Tudor court and the most famous events of a great age, The Marriage Game is a dramatic, complex and deeply poignant tale of intrigue, love and loss At its heart is our greatest Queen and the emotional truth of one of history s most extraordinary love affairs.


About the Author: Alison Weir

Librarian Note There isthan one author in the GoodReads database with this nameAlison Weir is a British writer of history books for the The Marriage Kindle - general public, mostly in the form of biographies about British kings and queens, and of historical fiction Before becoming an author, Weir worked as a teacher of children with special needs She received her formal training in history at teacher training college She currently lives in Surrey, England, with her two children.


10 thoughts on “The Marriage Game

  1. says:

    To start, I will admit that I have a lukewarm relationship with Weir s writing I have rated her works between 2 4 stars, though I usually enjoy her novelsthan her nonfiction I found myself double checking the name on this cover because it was so reminiscent of another author that I have sworn not to read again.Specifically, this novel was boringly repetitive, shallow, and a very unappealing picture of Elizabeth I Not being a fan of Elizabeth the way many are, I was prepared for the char To start, I will admit that I have a lukewarm relationship with Weir s writing I have rated her works between 2 4 stars, though I usually enjoy her novelsthan her nonfiction I found myself double checking the name on this cover because it was so reminiscent of another author that I have sworn not to read again.Specifically, this novel was boringly repetitive, shallow, and a very unappealing picture of Elizabeth I Not being a fan of Elizabeth the way many are, I was prepared for the characterization of her as a manipulative, selfish monarch who left the country ripe for civil war with her refusal to plan for her succession This is actually worse.She is petty, cruel, and unreasonable Elizabeth leads her suitors on for decades and then falls into torrents of tears when any man gives up on her and dares to marry another I couldn t help but feel sorry for Robert Dudley, who gave up over 20 years of his life believing that she would eventually marry him On the other hand, I could not fathom why he would want to marry her Surely, even the crown of England could not be worth putting up with this vain shrew.While I do believe that Elizabeth was probably as manipulative as Weir has painted her, I hope that she was at least a littleintelligent The focus of this novel, as the title suggests, is the constant evasions of Elizabeth when it came to her marriage She would encourage suitors then send them away, invite them to her bed but frustrate them before culmination, and promise her hand only to quickly change her mind.Every other line spoken by Elizabeth in this novel was some version of I will not be told what to do Pout, stomp, and preen She even has irritating nicknames for the poor men lining up to kiss her feet my Eyes, my Spirit, and my Frog I really wish I was making that up There is also an excessive use of exclamations On the other hand, some aspects of Elizabeth s rule could have been used to make her look even worse The fate of the Grey sisters is only the subject of a few sentences, writing off some of the most hateful and baseless actions of the revered Virgin Queen.Based on previous reviews, I had hoped that I may enjoy this negative portrayal of Elizabeththan others who wish to believe that she is a wonderful example of womanhood My lack of recommendation for this novel isdue to the dumbing down of Elizabeth and her life story than it is because I think her personality has been slandered Thank you to NetGalley and Random House for my copy of this novel Opinions expressed are my own

  2. says:

    The Marriage Game is immediately flooded with red flags and cringe worthy moments starting the novel on a poor note As soon as page 10, Weir strikes with historical inaccuracies Whether this is due to Weir s own beliefs on the matter or merely taking a historical liberties on the pretext of fiction it is not of concern The point is that the general reader will accept this as truth and run with it based on Weir s fame for penning nonfiction history books Even aside from this blatant error, The Marriage Game is immediately flooded with red flags and cringe worthy moments starting the novel on a poor note As soon as page 10, Weir strikes with historical inaccuracies Whether this is due to Weir s own beliefs on the matter or merely taking a historical liberties on the pretext of fiction it is not of concern The point is that the general reader will accept this as truth and run with it based on Weir s fame for penning nonfiction history books Even aside from this blatant error, The Marriage Game is no better than a YA novel and a boring one, at that Elizabeth is depicted as a one dimensional, shallow character not truly exploring her womanly strengths and weaknesses Her romance with Robert, her refusal to marry, and the proposals from foreign princes are all portrayed by Weir as nothingthan high school drama Plus, it is the same thing on each page Nothing truly happens and the plot doesn t intensify or progress Weir over saturates the text of The Marriage Game with, As you know, Bob style storytelling in order to set the stage and explain Tudor back stories This is tedious and slackens the already slow pace of the novel Also evident is a chunky narrative with clear up and down arcs which are too extreme i.e slow and exciting then repeat several times The Marriage Game does have some strong moments such as the scandalous death of Amy Robsart Dudley s wife Although Weir doesn t pursue this in depth, she explores some of the possible theories providing the reader with historical context This is also true for other topics in The Marriage Game such as the situation with the imprisonment of Mary, Queen of Scots and other political forays Weir would have done much better composing a novel focusingon these historical events instead of an entire text on repetitive love and marriage The conclusion of The Marriage Game feels like a different novel entirely by taking a complete 180 degree turn off the marriage topic and instead focusing on the Spanish Armada This is strikingly emotional in comparison to the former portions of the novel but is noticeably disjointed leaving the love subject unanswered and merely forgotten Weir utilized an Author s Note using it to explain some historical liberties, her opinions, and inspirations Although, I would have preferred deeper explanations for the benefit of those general readers not as familiar with the topic it is still quite useful Sadly, The Marriage Game can be summed up as a heavy disappointment one dimensional, fluffy, boring, and quite meaningless It is not only light on the history but also doesn t really encourage the general reader to engage in further research The Marriage Game is nothingthan mindless entertainment a fast read and is only suggested for those unfamiliar with Elizabeth and Tudor England Those well read on the matters will gain absolutely nothing from The Marriage Game and are better off skipping it

  3. says:

    Wow if a fiction writer wrote a story like thisI am sure it would be rejected For being too implausible Yet Queen Elizabeth did just this I realised, early on in my reading, that I did not know the life of Queen Elizabeth as well as I thought I do realise the author focused on this part of her reign to tell how she used the marriage game for diplomacy reasons Realising that it was her position that was the prize Rather her the person But I really enjoyed reading the events, loved her Wow if a fiction writer wrote a story like thisI am sure it would be rejected For being too implausible Yet Queen Elizabeth did just this I realised, early on in my reading, that I did not know the life of Queen Elizabeth as well as I thought I do realise the author focused on this part of her reign to tell how she used the marriage game for diplomacy reasons Realising that it was her position that was the prize Rather her the person But I really enjoyed reading the events, loved her writing style and how I could see all the characters in my mind as real people.Unputdownable

  4. says:

    Spanning thirty years from Elizabeth I s coronation in 1558 to the historic events of 1588 and with an epilogue reflecting on the events of the rest of her life, Alison Weir s The Marriage Game is a mesmerizing book that kept me racing through its pages Information presented in story form makesof an impression and sticks with me better than dry facts, which is why I love books of this kind well researched, vividly written historical fiction.Basing this novel on historical fact, recorded Spanning thirty years from Elizabeth I s coronation in 1558 to the historic events of 1588 and with an epilogue reflecting on the events of the rest of her life, Alison Weir s The Marriage Game is a mesmerizing book that kept me racing through its pages Information presented in story form makesof an impression and sticks with me better than dry facts, which is why I love books of this kind well researched, vividly written historical fiction.Basing this novel on historical fact, recorded verbal exchanges, and legend, Weir gives readers a glimpse into what may have been going on in Elizabeth s heart and mind during the years of her reign when she used marriage negotiations as a diplomatic tool to strengthen her position at home and abroad Blending a love story which was steamier than you might expect from the Virgin Queen with the portrait of a strong ruler and fascinating woman The Marriage Game will hold the interest any reader who enjoys a good story, especially those already intrigued by Tudor history

  5. says:

    Setting Elizabethan England2 1 2 StarsThe marriage games began when Elizabeth becomes the newly crowned Queen The story of her reign as Queen, tells how Elizabeth was clever enough to keep those negotiations going for almost 30 years in hope of making England stronger.Queen Elizabeth uses her suitors as a diplomatic tool while still retaining her independence from any manwell any man except Robert Dudley, the handsome Master of the Horse and also rud to be Elizabeth s lover.But Elizabet Setting Elizabethan England2 1 2 StarsThe marriage games began when Elizabeth becomes the newly crowned Queen The story of her reign as Queen, tells how Elizabeth was clever enough to keep those negotiations going for almost 30 years in hope of making England stronger.Queen Elizabeth uses her suitors as a diplomatic tool while still retaining her independence from any manwell any man except Robert Dudley, the handsome Master of the Horse and also rud to be Elizabeth s lover.But Elizabeth is wary of marriage and she is most determined to remain free Even in later years, as the negotiations dwindle, she still ends up ruling the most powerful country in the world with a strong hand.While I did enjoy the Innocent Traitor and The Lady Elizabeth by this author, this was rather a big disappointment First off, the author claims it s based on historical events, letters, and conjecture Hmmmm.So my thoughts from this read Total lack of historical detail, and the place of time was totally missing here and I felt the story was just going around in circlesno beginning, middle or end While reading this I found the narrative style putting me off, yet I carried on. and still it became predictable, very repetitive and lacked of passion and the character development became a no go Speaking of character development, the author s portrayal of Queen Elizabeth was not favorable in the least We have here in The Marriage Game a very unappealing picture of Elizabeth I as petty, cruel, and totally unreasonable She pouts, stamps her foot when she doesn t get her way and is also portrayed as a tease that leads her suitors around by the crook of her finger And then goes into a tantrum and crying fit when one of her suitors leaves and moves on There was enough drama and sleaziness of a soap opera let me tell you in this book.If your a big Elizabeth I fan you might want to pass on this one, and pick up Susan Kay s or Margaret George s telling of her reigning years Or library loan like I did if you must.

  6. says:

    During my time in England, I have consumed an extraordinary number of BBC documentaries and the occasional drama about Britain s long, bloody, occasionally confused history Some of these covered the Plantagenets, but the lion s share tend to drift decidedly towards the Tudors Even the brutal episodes of internecine family bloodshed of the Wars of the Roses have nothing on slow motion car crash that is Henry VIII s six wives, Reformation, and Elizabethan England In The Marriage Game, Alison During my time in England, I have consumed an extraordinary number of BBC documentaries and the occasional drama about Britain s long, bloody, occasionally confused history Some of these covered the Plantagenets, but the lion s share tend to drift decidedly towards the Tudors Even the brutal episodes of internecine family bloodshed of the Wars of the Roses have nothing on slow motion car crash that is Henry VIII s six wives, Reformation, and Elizabethan England In The Marriage Game, Alison Weir focuses on the politics involved in Elizabeth I s marriage or lack thereof and how this influenced her relationship with Robert Dudley, the man most historians have labelled her lover in all of the various ways.Marriage now can still, occasionally, be the bond that cements alliances in the vast dynastic power struggles between great houses But not so much as it was in Elizabeth s time And Weir gives us a very good idea of the significance that Elizabeth s marriage would have for England and for the rest of Europe In a time where a Protestant England was a new and threatening prospect for Europe, Elizabeth s marriage was aboutthan controlling or ruling England It had direct bearing on the issues of who wielded absolute power over religious matters in Europe in that age The religion of Elizabeth s suitors, as well as that of her rival Mary Queen of Scots, would play a large role in determining Elizabeth s moves in this marriage game.It s Elizabeth who refers to the matter of her marriage as a game in an attempt to trivialize what is, for her, a terrifying prospect Weir shows how Elizabeth has to walk a very careful line Her Parliament and advisers are pressing her for a marriage, both because they doubt her ability, as a woman, to rule, and because it would strengthen England and provide allies against the enmity of France and Spain Elizabeth, understandably, is worried about the effect of marriage on her sovereignty as a ruler a fear compounded by what happens to Mary after her marriage to Darnley But she recognizes the precarious position that England is in Into this mix Weir adds the complicating factor of her own speculation about what befell Elizabeth when she was a teenager in the care of Thomas Seymour The Marriage Game paints Elizabeth as every bit the complicated person she should be, even if it s not quite the likeable character we d like her to be.Elizabeth kind of comes across as a horrible and manipulative person Her vacillation with regards to marrying Dudley is very annoying Whenever she decides to renege on what was a fervent pledge to marry him, she buys him off with a title or land or a castle And it works, because in the end he sconcerned with his worldly advancement than with actually being married to Elizabeth but he still wants to get in her pants at the earliest opportunity As Elizabeth gets older and her marriage prospects diminish, the harsh and vindictive parts of her personality only seem to heighten I don t agree with those reviewers who assert that these unlikeable aspects of Elizabeth s personality necessarily make her unsympathetic as a character I can sympathize with Elizabeth s dilemma and the emotions that motivate her to act in these ways, even if I don t particularly like what she does as a result.Certainly what Weir emphasizes above all else is the sense of loneliness that Elizabeth must have felt She was a woman without peer Her closest friends are some of her ladies in waiting who had been companions since her tumultuous years as a young adult during Edward and Mary s brief reigns But they don t really understand the pressure she experiences as a woman monarch Her most intimate confidante is Robert himself, and he isn t exactly an impartial party So it s not a surprise that Elizabeth projects her uneasiness onto Mary Queen of Scots Though Mary is a deadly rival, she is, like Elizabeth, a woman struggling to rule a kingdom with deep religious divides It galls Elizabeth that Mary has no problem taking a husband and producing an heir of her body, despite the fact that Elizabeth s failure to do so is ultimately a decision she made Yet despite Mary s clear involvement in plots against Elizabeth, Elizabeth is still horrified by the prospect of executing another country s deposed monarch.As a character study, The Marriage Game is an insightful look into this interpretation of Elizabeth Yet at times Weir leans too much on character to drive the story Her expertise as a non fiction author shines through here A novel, by definition, really needs a plot I don t remember The Captive Queen being as dull as the events here Told in yearly chapters, the story here feels episodic but repetitive, with the same scenes being repeated over the years as Elizabeth s advisers tell her to marry and she throws a strop thanks, England, for the vocabulary It is definitely interesting, but only to a point.The Marriage Game retells and reexamines Elizabeth I s reign through the lens of her marriage negotiations Weir does an excellent job demonstrating how important this single part of Elizabeth s life was, both to her as a person and to her realm She interrogates the motivations behind Elizabeth s reluctance to marry and Robert Dudley s desire for her hand As a story, it feels very flat there s plenty of drama, but it s of the one note variety As a history, however, it s interesting and enlightening I won t call it the best or most memorable piece of historical fiction I ve read, but I certainly enjoyed Weir s perspective and speculation on England s Virgin Queen

  7. says:

    What a disappointing novel Weir s Innocent Traitor is one of my favourite books I ve read, and her first novel about Elizabeth, The Lady Elizabeth prior to her Queen ship was a good read too This one however falls completely flat I had to force my way through the pages as the repetition of will she won t she in regards to marriage went from bad to worse Yes, I understand that Elizabeth was smart in playing her marriage card in astute political ways but seriously there was a lott What a disappointing novel Weir s Innocent Traitor is one of my favourite books I ve read, and her first novel about Elizabeth, The Lady Elizabeth prior to her Queen ship was a good read too This one however falls completely flat I had to force my way through the pages as the repetition of will she won t she in regards to marriage went from bad to worse Yes, I understand that Elizabeth was smart in playing her marriage card in astute political ways but seriously there was a lotto her reign than just that Even though this novel is entitled The Marriage Game I had hoped that there would becontent than just boring talks between Elizabeth and her councilors about who to marry, why to marry, when to marry etc There wasn t The Spanish Armada Limited to mere pages in comparison Same for the trial of Mary Queen of Scots As for the relationship between Elizabeth and Robert, it gave me a headache The constant backwards and forewords did not make for an enjoyable read In fact, Elizabeth s petty behavior towards him turned this legendary Queen into a bitter shrew and I cannot believe that this is the portrayal that Ms Weir decided to take with her I am so disappointed.The main reason I give this novel two stars instead of one is because I appreciate the author s note in which Weir explains her reasoning behind certain aspects of the book I feel as though the research is there, it s just the character development and the narrative style that I take issue with I think I ll stick with Weir s non fiction from now on

  8. says:

    I think I was disappointed in this It got very repetitive and sometimes the writing style became very peculiar, as if Alison Weir was forgetting herself and slipping back into her non fiction style, and just listing what had happened chronologically rather than telling a story Her Elizabeth was a little caricature at times too.Basically, it was fine, but there are better Elizabeth I bio novels out there.

  9. says:

    Reading this book is like being on a never ending carousel ride the scenery never changes and it becomes tiresome The same scenario is played out repeatedly, regardless of the suitor, and all the characters and the reader too quickly become exasperated with Elizabeth s antics It isn t a very complimentary picture of Elizabeth She comes off as unstable, shallow, prone to histrionics, manipulative, and even occasionally, malicious We will never know why This Queen never married,and there Reading this book is like being on a never ending carousel ride the scenery never changes and it becomes tiresome The same scenario is played out repeatedly, regardless of the suitor, and all the characters and the reader too quickly become exasperated with Elizabeth s antics It isn t a very complimentary picture of Elizabeth She comes off as unstable, shallow, prone to histrionics, manipulative, and even occasionally, malicious We will never know why This Queen never married,and there s probably a few reasons.Her Mothers death To many executions Only twenty five and newly crowned, Elizabeth vows to rule the country as both queen and king But her counselors continually press her to form an advantageous marriage and produce an heir Though none of the suitors have yet worked their way to her throne, the dashing though married Lord Robert lays claim to Elizabeth s heart Their flagrant flirting, their unescorted outings, and the appointment of Lord Robert to Master of Horse inspire whispers through the court, and even rumors that Elizabeth has secretly given birth to Lord Robert s child Events take a dark turn when Robert s wife is found dead Universal shock is followed by accusations of murder Despite the scandal, Elizabeth and Robert manage to navigate the choppy political, economic, and religious waters around them But the greatest obstacle to marriage between the Queen and her true love may come not from outside forces, but from within

  10. says:

    I was really disappointed in this book Alison Weir is a respected novelist and writer of historical fiction Her books are usually well researched and well done This makes The Marriage Game that muchdisappointing The Marriage Game is the story of Elizabeth I beginning with her assuming the throne Unfortunately, Alison Weir chose to focus on the most salacious rumors rather than creating a compelling story of one of the most powerful women in history Weir s Elizabeth is a spoiled, capr I was really disappointed in this book Alison Weir is a respected novelist and writer of historical fiction Her books are usually well researched and well done This makes The Marriage Game that muchdisappointing The Marriage Game is the story of Elizabeth I beginning with her assuming the throne Unfortunately, Alison Weir chose to focus on the most salacious rumors rather than creating a compelling story of one of the most powerful women in history Weir s Elizabeth is a spoiled, capricious bratinterested in making out with Robert Dudley than ruling England The first third of the book is scene after scene of her pouting, flirting, and doing just about everything short of actually having sex I ve read many books by Alison Weir, and this one is just terrible I was so annoyed by it that I gave up on it before finishing it

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