The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in

The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in
    IGNOU books 2019 In Hindi Online PDF Free her father The Woman PDF/EPUB or s family Her failure to produce a male heir was ultimately the twist of fate that paved the way for her inconceivable rule as a cross dressing king At just twenty, Hatshepsut ascended to the rank of king in an elaborate coronation ceremony that set the tone for her spectacular twenty two year reign as co regent with Thutmose III, the infant king whose mother Hatshepsut out maneuvered for a seat on the throne Hatshepsut was a master strategist, cloaking her political power Woman Who Would Kindle Ö plays with the veil of piety and sexual expression Just as women today face obstacles from a society that equates authority with masculinity, Hatshepsut had to shrewdly operate the levers of a patriarchal system to emerge as Egypt s second female pharaohHatshepsut had successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt s most prolific building periods Scholars have long speculated as to why her images were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her rule Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power and why she fell from public favor just as quickly The Woman Who Would Be King traces the unconventional life of an almost forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 298 pages
  • The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt
  • Kara Cooney
  • English
  • 16 March 2019
  • 0307956768

The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt❰Read❯ ➵ The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt Author Kara Cooney – Essayreview.co.uk An engrossing biography of the longest reigning female pharaoh in Ancient Egypt and the story of her audacious rise to power in a man s world Hatshepsut, the daughter of a general who took Egypt s thr An Who Would Be King: ePUB Ì engrossing biography of the longest Who Would eBook ☆ reigning female pharaoh in Ancient Egypt and the story of her audacious rise to power in a man s world Hatshepsut, the daughter of a general who took Egypt s throne without status as a king s son and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty, was born into a privileged position of the royal household Married to her brother, she was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father The Woman PDF/EPUB or s family Her failure to produce a male heir was ultimately the twist of fate that paved the way for her inconceivable rule as a cross dressing king At just twenty, Hatshepsut ascended to the rank of king in an elaborate coronation ceremony that set the tone for her spectacular twenty two year reign as co regent with Thutmose III, the infant king whose mother Hatshepsut out maneuvered for a seat on the throne Hatshepsut was a master strategist, cloaking her political power Woman Who Would Kindle Ö plays with the veil of piety and sexual expression Just as women today face obstacles from a society that equates authority with masculinity, Hatshepsut had to shrewdly operate the levers of a patriarchal system to emerge as Egypt s second female pharaohHatshepsut had successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt s most prolific building periods Scholars have long speculated as to why her images were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her rule Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power and why she fell from public favor just as quickly The Woman Who Would Be King traces the unconventional life of an almost forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.


About the Author: Kara Cooney

Dr Who Would Be King: ePUB Ì Kathlyn M Cooney aka Dr Who Would eBook ☆ Kara Cooney is an Egyptologist and Assistant Professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at UCLA She was awarded a PhD in by Johns Hopkins University for Near Eastern Studies She was part of an archaeological team excavating at the artisans village of Deir el Medina in Egypt, as well as Dahshur and various tombs at ThebesIn she was Kress Fellow at the National Gallery of Art and worked on the preparation of the Cairo The Woman PDF/EPUB or Museum exhibition Quest for Immortality Treasures of Ancient Egypt She was a member of the teaching staff at Stanford and Howard University In , she acted as fellow curator for Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Raised in Houston, she obtained her BA from the University of TexasShe worked on two Discovery Channel documentary series Out of Egypt, first aired in August , and Egypt s Lost Queen, which also featured Dr Zahi Woman Who Would Kindle Ö Hawass.


10 thoughts on “The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt

  1. says:

    Full disclosure I requested an ARC of this book and was approved for it.I m an Egyptologist, so it ll be no surprise if I reveal that I have been quite eager to get my hands on this book The author is not a new name to me in fact I reviewed her tv series a few years back I d recommend it to beginners wholeheartedly, though it didn t really offer anything new to me and a new biography of Hatshepsut is definitely a cause for excitement The last Hatshepsut biography I ve seen was Joyce Tyl Full disclosure I requested an ARC of this book and was approved for it.I m an Egyptologist, so it ll be no surprise if I reveal that I have been quite eager to get my hands on this book The author is not a new name to me in fact I reviewed her tv series a few years back I d recommend it to beginners wholeheartedly, though it didn t really offer anything new to me and a new biography of Hatshepsut is definitely a cause for excitement The last Hatshepsut biography I ve seen was Joyce Tyldesley s Hatchepsut The Female Pharaoh in 1996, which I recall as being rather dry Events in Egyptology have moved on rather a lot since then, especially with the advent of new genetic testing techniques which has recently been shaking up what we know about Egyptian mummies and their familial relationships to each other A brand new biography of Hatshepsut has been long overdue.From the beginning, Cooney sets a very modern slant on the biography, questioning why Hatshepsut s story is so little known when she was one of the very few successful female rulers in the ancient world Kleopatra VII s name is farwidely recognised, globally Why is this Cooney proposes that this is a result of an extensive human history of patriarchy and misogynistic gender roles Kleopatra VII, so often unfairly stereotyped as an insidious seducer using her feminine wiles to secure her grasp on power and oriental opulence, fits into a patriarchal narrative of an ambitious woman who dares to go out of her perceived place as a woman by reaching for power, and ultimately getting what she deserves whereas Hatshepsut does not neatly fit into this narrative because she was a wholly successful female ruler for twenty two long years, little opposed, widely supported, and lacking a lurid sticky end So argues Cooney Cooney has a strong case, and this new modernist perspective on both Hatshepsut herself and how Egyptologists in the past have interpreted her story, sheds some long overdue fresh light on its subject However, like so many things in history, I would point out that there are other reasons why Kleopatra VII is rememberedthan Hatshepsut Hollywood s big budget movie starring Elizabeth Taylor being one of them, another reason being that the ability to read Latin, and thus Roman authors hostile accounts of Kleopatra VII, has never been lost, as opposed to Egyptian hieroglyphs which remained an opaque mystery until Champollion s decipherment in 1822.Cooney further argues, in relation to Hatshepsut s relative obscurity, that the monarch provided a puzzle to historians and Egyptologists who first attempted to tell her story, and even amongst many of the general public today How does one categorize a female leader who does not follow the expected course of disaster and shame, one who instead puts everything to rights in the end, in a way so perfect that her masculine beneficiaries just sweep her victories under the rug and ignore her forever Female rulers are often implicitly branded as emotional, self interested, lacking in authority, untrustworthy, and impolitic. The stand out example of a well known, successful female monarch in the modern consciousness is, of course, Elizabeth I of Tudor England, and it s worth comparing the two for a moment Elizabeth categorised herself as both mother to, and wedded to, her people, and encouraged the building up of her public figure as the pious Virgin Queen, the prosperous, and popular, Faerie Queen the bounty and flourishing of England, it is suggested through this idealised characterisation, is magically manifested through the monarch, or through divine favour smiling on the monarch s piety Elizabeth was a master propagandist and interestingly, so too was the Hatshepsut Cooney reveals Cooney explores at length Hatshepsut s enormous propaganda campaign to facilitate her unconventional assumption of kingship Monumental and religious building works proclaim Hatshepsut as a pious daughter of the god Amun, assuming power only in his name, because the god himself chose her to rule Reliefs depicting the expedition to faraway Punt advertise Hatshepsut s success as a ruler, bringing exotic bounty and riches to Egypt surely a visible sign of the favour of the gods The key differences between these two extraordinary women who lived 3000 years apart is that Hatshepsut already had an heir, her nephew, Thutmose III, with whom she shared the throne, the limelight, and increasingly the power Elizabeth famously refused to name an heir, keeping power focused firmly in her own hands and Elizabeth used her gender as an asset of international politics, putting her eligibility to England s use, but ultimately unable to marry due to general fear of foreign influence or factional favouritism Hatshepsut too, as a royal woman of Egypt, was unable to marry again after her husband s death, and not even able to put herself forwards as a marriageable candidate no foreign influence could be brought to bear on the Egyptian throne through a royal woman marrying outside the country, and a child of this unconventional female king could not be accepted, as a threat to her nephew and co king although, in Hatshepsut s case, Cooney argues the queen had plenty of opportunity to find private romantic happiness But I digress in this interesting comparison, since Cooney does not touch upon it in the text.As for Hatshepsut s love life, it should be noted that whilst Cooney believes Hatshepsut had ample opportunity to pursue a private arrangement, there is in fact no evidence of such a relationship, or who might have been her romantic partner The Egyptologist community has widely discussed Senenmut in such a role in the past a man of obscure family origins who surprisingly rose to astronomically high office under Hatshepsut s auspices, Senenmut was also permitted to depict himself on monuments as being especially favoured by Hatshepsut, and having a close connection with the royal family through his role as tutor to Hatshepsut s daughter Neferure some have even suggested that Senenmut, not Thutmose II, was in fact the girl s father, though Cooney rubbishes this idea But despite these obvious signs of favour, ultimately a romantic relationship cannot be inferred Useramun, a vizier of noble birth, was permitted by Hatshepsut to inscribe the sacred Book of Amduat in his tomb, something usually reserved only for royalty from which we might equally suppose a romantic relationship, but with ultimately just as much lack of definitive proof aside from Hatshepsut s extraordinary favour Ancient Egypt enthusiasts may be scratching their heads wondering about that rock graffiti at Deir el Bahri that s supposed to depict Senenmut and Hatshepsut in the carnal act, carved by some gossipy workmen The simple fact of the matter is though, as Cooney points out, neither figure is labelled with a name, nor is the subservient figure in the scene adorned with any of the symbols of office of kingship Cooney not only provides asocial, modern history of Hatshepsut, but she devotes time to busting old myths that have long been discarded by the Egyptological community but still persist in the popular imagination among them, the idea that Hatshepsut set out to steal the throne from her nephew s rightful claim, or that Thutmose III set about destroying her monuments in a fit of righteous anger after her death.Cooney acknowledges from the start that My Egyptological work on social life has enabled me to re create Hatshepsut s world as best I can and thereby to know her better. Cooney adds that so much evidence is lost from this period, or exists only in the official propaganda of monumental building works, that in recent times Egyptologists have focused too much on a history of Hatshepsut s monuments rather than the woman herself, reluctant to fill the gaps in history with speculation about Hatshepsut s motivations and opinions and turning instead to the tangible but unrevealing evidence of the monuments I have to say, I agree with Cooney on this, even though I admit to being professionally reluctant to ascribe to ancient individuals thoughts and feelings that are ultimately unknowable, and I feel that this new social history with a gendered consideration of Hatshepsut s life is just what the subject needs From the perspective of a reader and an Egyptologist, I prefer the social approach, and at the very least, even if this book is not well received by the Egyptological community I await the reaction of my colleagues with baited breath , I think most will welcome the fresh take on Hatshepsut and the opportunity for fresh debate in this area.Cooney states openly from the outset Many historians will no doubt accuse me of fantasy inventing emotions and feelings for which I have no evidence And they will be right. Cooney is right The text is filled with Cooney s postulations about what Hatshepsut s reasoning may have been for this decision or that decision, or what she may have been thinking when this or that event happened in her life Reading the text I don t think anyone would mistake that Cooney is saying Hatshepsut did think this or feel that, but she will receive criticism for hypothesizing in this manner Archaeologists are notoriously reluctant to speculate about beliefs the highest tier of what we can know about the past, and the hardest to access, since unless a person wrote down their thoughts this is ultimately unknowable and lost to us and even when written down, the ancient historian has to be supremely cautious, taking into account the biases of the writer and the potential for propaganda or unreliable accounts Indeed, as an Egyptologist I feel ethically obligated to stress what Cooney admits openly these scenes throughout the book are supposition and should not be taken as the final word on the character or nature of Hatshepsut That disclaimer out of the way, I d like to applaud Cooney for being bold enough to make use of such supposition Whilst there s no way to know for sure, such speculations are not just plucked out of thin air, rather they are reasoned and considered possibilities built on the foundation of what we do know about Hatshepsut and the environment and circumstances in which she moved, and thus are supported by a certain degree of likelihood, even if they re ultimately unprovable, and I would be reluctant to set any of the scenarios Cooney postulates in stone forgiving the pun Nevertheless, as such, I personally feel that this approach is a worthwhile and valuable contribution to the Egyptological community, since it has the potential to fuel healthy debate and bring us closer to our subject, and that overcaution in such matters may be ultimately limiting to the field as a whole.Whether The Woman Who Would Be King is well received by the rest of the Egyptological community remains to be seen, and may be a matter for personal ideology in regards to how we approach archaeology and ancient history However, I have no doubt that it will go down well amongst a wider readership Cooney s writing style is fluid, lucid, and engaging, making it a perfectly enjoyable read for a mass audience, and her subject, Hatshepsut, is not so obscure that the casually interested history enthusiast won t be drawn in to this book.All in all, highly recommended, and it gets my Egyptologist s official seal of approval 8 out of 10

  2. says:

    Disclaimer ARC via the publisher and Netgalley When you think of an Egyptian female ruler, who do you think of If the answer is Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra, Dr Kara Cooney wants to talk to you I have to admit that Dr Cooney annoyed me a bit in the introduction I swear if I saw the phrase twenty two years of experience again I was going to smack someone I was reading this on my Kindle, so I couldn t throw it But after reading this excellent book, I can see why she might feel that s Disclaimer ARC via the publisher and Netgalley When you think of an Egyptian female ruler, who do you think of If the answer is Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra, Dr Kara Cooney wants to talk to you I have to admit that Dr Cooney annoyed me a bit in the introduction I swear if I saw the phrase twenty two years of experience again I was going to smack someone I was reading this on my Kindle, so I couldn t throw it But after reading this excellent book, I can see why she might feel that she has to defend her background This is because some people will say that this book is too much a guesswork b conjecture or c romanticized It is and isn t a and b as for c, well that s just the first bit, and she doesn t do it again until the very end and you could argue that she doesn t even then Cooney s book, in case you can t tell from the title, is a biography of Hatshepsut a female pharaoh who ruled even though her step son was old enough to rule on his own Because Hatshepsut is an ancient Egyptian first hand source material isn t as common as say the letters of Elizabeth I, so in fairness, any writer about Hatshepsut s life is making guesses at many points Dr Cooney is very clear when she is speculating, and further, she lets the reader follow how she forms her conclusions She presents evidence with nice, detailed footnotes that contain eveninformation , and presents both sides or all legitimate sides of an issue then offers her conclusion When, for instance, she is discussing Hatshepsut s emotional and physical love life, she places it in context of Egypt and physical love instead of simply recycling the whole did she or didn t she with Senemut debate and she points out there, we have no way of truly knowing Cooney s thesis, in part, is that Hatshepsut should be better known, and knownfor simply having a relatively peaceful reign where she just sat on the throne, and she is correct, too, when she points out the strangeness of celebrating Cleopatra but not Hatshepsut who kept her throne without using seductive wiles though, perhaps that answers the question why Further, she argues that Hatshepsut s reign and success might have set the tone for the role of women in later dynasties It is a convincing argument, at least to this non Egyptologist The soul of the book besides Hatshepsut s rule is Hatshepsut and religion While the story of Hatshepsut s conception is known by those who know the king s history, Cooney places it a great context not only of other Pharaoh s making the story soundcommon than other popular histories Additionally, she focuses on the religious functions and duties of the pharaoh She gives acomplete view of the time so the reader not only knows about Hatshepsut, but also about the era that gave birth to her and in which she ruled My only criticism is that I would have foundspace spent on why the moderns ignore Hatshepsut to be a plus, considering the strong points she makes in the beginning about how we moderns view the ancients I agree with her, I just wish there had been a bitdetail in these sections that come at the beginning and end This book is highly recommended for fans of Ironside s She King series as well as any interested in Egyptian history.Crossposted at Booklikes

  3. says:

    www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.comI had no idea Hatshepsut was a KING That is just so cool She was the first woman to have a long term as a King I know I shouldn t say this in a review, but I used to always say I want to be King and my friends would say don t you mean Queen and I m like. no KING So this is really cool to find out See what all you find out when you read just about everything out there Some of the things went over my head a little in the book And the author wrote a lo www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.comI had no idea Hatshepsut was a KING That is just so cool She was the first woman to have a long term as a King I know I shouldn t say this in a review, but I used to always say I want to be King and my friends would say don t you mean Queen and I m like. no KING So this is really cool to find out See what all you find out when you read just about everything out there Some of the things went over my head a little in the book And the author wrote a lot like this may have happened, but she clearly states in the preface there isn t a whole lot of records etc She did have a ton of notes in the back where she got some information so that was cool Hatshepsut s immediate family were some of the most important people in Egypt, her dad was Thutmose I and her mother Ahmes I got the heebie jeebies a little bit reading about children having sex or marrying their fathers, but that was normal over there There is like a whole section talking about how they were infected with many diseases and parasites and such in Egypt I mean, the things you learn, seriously Here is a section of the book talking about some of it The ancient Egyptians knew that infested water was the cause of many maladies, so elites in the palace relied on wine and beer distilled or processed products killed worms and fleas along with their larvae The flip side, of course, was that the palace population spent day after day in a constant state of low level intoxication.Babies didn t make it very good over there either If a baby made it to three years of age, weaning was the next danger zone.But Hatshepsut survived, beating the odds facing all Egyptian children, many of whom would have perished before the age of five.After her father died, Hatshepsut married her brother, Thutmose II and had a baby girl with him and maybe , they don t know She was still alive when he died She then started making plans to become King Her young half brother became King as a little child and she signed on as co King She basically did everything and became named King She did a lot of amazing things and when Thutmose III became a man he did all of the war campaigns When Hatshepsut died around the age of 40, Thutmose III suddenly startedwar campaigns and tearing down all of her monuments and stuff I guess he figured he didn t want anything of hers around any .It was really cool reading about Hatshepsut even though they don t know a lot to be recorded I enjoyed the book I would like to thank BLOGGING FOR BOOKS for this print book in exchange for my honest review

  4. says:

    Next year, Hilary Mantel will publish the eagerly awaited final volume in her Thomas Cromwell trilogy Like the other two, this will win a Man Booker Prize The night of her big award, Hilary will relax in her fluffy armchair under the wise gaze of three golden trophies on her mantle Do they do that Or is that just for Oscars Hilary will immediately start to fret and ask herself oh dear, what will I write next That night, she will pick up this book The next morning, her publisher will a Next year, Hilary Mantel will publish the eagerly awaited final volume in her Thomas Cromwell trilogy Like the other two, this will win a Man Booker Prize The night of her big award, Hilary will relax in her fluffy armchair under the wise gaze of three golden trophies on her mantle Do they do that Or is that just for Oscars Hilary will immediately start to fret and ask herself oh dear, what will I write next That night, she will pick up this book The next morning, her publisher will announce she has begun work on the Hatshepsut trilogy This book is begging to be novelized Our protagonist an extraordinary woman who seizes political power while still a teenager A usurper who steals the crown from her nephew in order to preserve her family s hold on influence A master ruler who ushers prosperity into Egypt A brilliant player who uses religion to solidify power A schemer who plays the court intrigue as well as Cromwell A woman who bends the expectations and representations of gender A monarch who history has tried to destroy Look me in the eye and tell me that wouldn t win Ms Mantel a fourth Booker prize.I have the greatest respect for Kara Cooney for attempting this project A biography of Hatshepsut is the sort of project given to a stodgy professor emeritus, not an uppity young member of academia Cooney is quite defensive in her introduction and acknowledgments, not solely for the ambitious nature of the project Hatshepsut lived a long time ago This may seem like an obvious statement But 15th century BC is way, way, way back Any hard evidence from her reign has had to survive 3500 hundred years of heat, political unrest, and grave robberies Since Hatshepsut s successors attempted to obliterate her from the archaeological record, we have even less evidence about her A biography of Hatshepsut based solely on the evidence that remains to us would likely be as long as the average short story Cooney is so defensive throughout the book because this biography is almost entirely conjecture No doubt, she had recurring nightmares of coworkers and supervisors perusing her book with a red pen and grumbling about her lack of evidence Yet Cooney has done the best she could given the information She has been careful to always note when she has moved onto her own personal suppositions, and to document what little hard evidence she does have Some may say that her attempt to see Hatshepsut and her contemporaries as actual people, not historical cardboard cut outs, is romantic and not very scholarly I personally found them welcome.I imagine this book will get a great deal of flak from the academic community Cooney s reliance on the supposition will doubtlessly be criticized I don t really care It was a wonderful and immensely readable book I have learned a great deal about ancient Egypt, a period of time I have never studied It provides excellent meditations on the intersection of gender and leadership I m fine with well based supposition if it gets the point across I hope to readfrom Cooney in the future.I received a free ARC of this book through Goodreads First Reads in exchange for an honest review

  5. says:

    Kara Cooney is a professor of Egyptian art and architecture As such, her treatise on the life and rule of Hatshepsut is quite academic From the description, I was expecting afictionalized tale, written as a story instead of a chronological account of the period and the monarch riddled with footnotes Also, since much of the minutiae of Hatshepsut s life is not known, possibilities of what might have happened are strewn throughout The myriad sentences and passages beginning with words an Kara Cooney is a professor of Egyptian art and architecture As such, her treatise on the life and rule of Hatshepsut is quite academic From the description, I was expecting afictionalized tale, written as a story instead of a chronological account of the period and the monarch riddled with footnotes Also, since much of the minutiae of Hatshepsut s life is not known, possibilities of what might have happened are strewn throughout The myriad sentences and passages beginning with words and phrases such as might have, possibly, likely, and perhaps actually serve to make her text less believable It s clear that these assumptions are based on extensive research and understanding of the culture, but the reader just feels like she s making it all up Because of this, the book falls into a space between an authoritative account of archaeological study and straight up fiction Many passages are quite repetitive, and reading it became a slog towards the end However, the importance of a work regarding this important historical woman is evident There seems to be much debate about Hatshepsut s reign and apparently prior Egyptologists have regarded her as a scheming, ambitious bitch Anuanced and feminist view of her reign is welcome I am sure aacademic reader would be better served by this text than I, so I would recommend it as a classroom text or introduction for a student seriously interested in archaeology or Egyptology

  6. says:

    My number one complaint about The Woman Who Would Be King is the writing style choice of the author s The writing wassuited for historical fiction but included biographical moments as well Ultimately the author needed to decide if she wanted to write HF or NF, sadly she chose to mix the two and it does not mix Overall I would not say this classifies as a biography, at least not a true one.Although my number one complaint is the author s writing style choice, it is followed very closely My number one complaint about The Woman Who Would Be King is the writing style choice of the author s The writing wassuited for historical fiction but included biographical moments as well Ultimately the author needed to decide if she wanted to write HF or NF, sadly she chose to mix the two and it does not mix Overall I would not say this classifies as a biography, at least not a true one.Although my number one complaint is the author s writing style choice, it is followed very closely by the author s conjecture This conjecture is directly tied into the HF since we cannot even begin to really know what a figure in history from thousands of years ago felt at a given moment or made a decision based on I grew increasingly frustrated and tired of hearing the author say probably and likely and perhaps and so on and so forth Stop guessing And if you are guessing please include all logical conclusions, not just the one you like the most Again, why did the author not write HF The author also seems to have a Hatshepsut of gold in her head, she could do no wrong Hatshepsut was just too special for words and was meant for greatness from the beginning At least that is what the author believes and she isn t shy about sharing her love for Hatshepsut Unfortunately while the author s love for her subject shines through, her infallible and golden Hatshepsut does not feel true to real life and made Hatshepsut being a successful female ruler almost pale in comparison Why was her being a major ruler thousands of years ago not enough for this author Overall there is simply too little known about Hatshepsut to complete a lengthy biography The author would have been smart to write an HF about a figure in history that clearly intrigues her As far as a biography goes, Cooney failed and if she had succeeded the book probably would have been too short to satisfy publishers Even with the HF style included this book was extremely repetitive I do not need such lengthy speculation and conjecture on a historical figure s motivations and emotions You are NEVER going to know the person s emotions at a given moment, NEVER Please stop trying Disclosure ARC received from Netgalley publisher in exchange for an honest review They may regret this Any and all quotes were taken from an advanced edition subject to change in the final edition.

  7. says:

    I just read Cooney s most recent book When Women Ruled the World I was impressed enough to hunt down other of Cooney s publications I found this one about the life of Hatshepsut.Hatshepsut ruled Egypt as Pharaoh approximately 3500 years ago She reigned for twenty two years Apparently, Hatshepsut was the High Priestess of Egypt prior to taking the throne According to Cooney she did no wrong and Egypt thrived under her reign She built strong trade agreements, expanded the Empire and lost n I just read Cooney s most recent book When Women Ruled the World I was impressed enough to hunt down other of Cooney s publications I found this one about the life of Hatshepsut.Hatshepsut ruled Egypt as Pharaoh approximately 3500 years ago She reigned for twenty two years Apparently, Hatshepsut was the High Priestess of Egypt prior to taking the throne According to Cooney she did no wrong and Egypt thrived under her reign She built strong trade agreements, expanded the Empire and lost no wars As there were no diaries, etc., Cooney said she had to use conjecture to flesh out the fascinating story of her life I am glad I listen to this on audiobook and listen to Cooney pronounce all the hard to say Egyptian names I found this a most interesting story The book is ten hours and twenty three minutes Kara Cooney does an excellent job narrating the book

  8. says:

    To sum up this book in one sentence Hatshepsut was a badass No, seriously From a disturbingly young age, she was considered the wife of the god Amun, which involved daily ceremonies in which she had to give handjobs to a statue with a huge boner in the words of Buffy Summers, Note to self religion freaky Then around the time she hit puberty, she was married off to her brother, because that was how Ancient Egypt rolled She failed to produce a son or at least a son that lived , and then To sum up this book in one sentence Hatshepsut was a badass No, seriously From a disturbingly young age, she was considered the wife of the god Amun, which involved daily ceremonies in which she had to give handjobs to a statue with a huge boner in the words of Buffy Summers, Note to self religion freaky Then around the time she hit puberty, she was married off to her brother, because that was how Ancient Egypt rolled She failed to produce a son or at least a son that lived , and then her brother husband up and died on her One of his sons from another wife was put on the throne, but said son was only a toddler So Hatshepsut was all I mma run this whole damned country And she did an amazing job of it for 20 odd years She manipulated and sent expeditions to Punt and built a ton of amazing stuff and tried to create a legacy by marrying her daughter off to her nephew step son co Pharaoh and created new and sneaky ways to let a woman use the title of King And then she died, and her rudeass nephew step son co Pharaoh decided that she d ruined basically everything and he was going to take her portrait off basically everything to legitimise his reign Basically I m pretty sure Hatshepsut was the Alexander Hamilton of Ancient Egypt, but withincest and statue handjobs Essentially, this book was very well researched and had a good balance between historical fact and the inevitable speculation that comes with books about the ancient world where there s a lack of evidence, historians have to try and fill in the gaps And Cooney did so with a lot of maybe this happened We don t know , which was an excellent balance between We have no idea what happened and This is my personal theory that I m going to spout as fact There s definitely an emphasis on the highly sexual nature of Ancient Egyptian society, particularly in the early chapters, so if that s a problem for you maybe don t pick this one up But if you want to knowabout Alexander Hatshepsut, this is probably a good starting point

  9. says:

    An excellent biography of Hatshepsut of Ancient Egypt I have heard of her, of course, as I am a big fan of archaeology and egyptology But this book brings so muchto the story For instance, did you know that if a woman can t give birth to a daughter, she isn t blamed The Egyptians believed she was just a vessel, that all the responsibility was the man s The story follows her entire life and the family history that led to her reign I highly recommend this immensely readable story.

  10. says:

    Maybe a 3 Pushing itMuch of this is based on conjecture Sorry this was audio so I can t spell any names to save my life, but most of what is described of her reign is based on generalities except for her great architectural blessings Did not realize the ancient Egyptians were such a sexually based society so if you listen to this book you may wish to watch your company.

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