The Old Man PDF/EPUB ð The Old MOBI :Á

The Old Man PDF/EPUB ð The Old  MOBI :Á
  • Paperback
  • 140 pages
  • The Old Man
  • William Faulkner
  • English
  • 08 March 2019

The Old Man[BOOKS] ✯ The Old Man By William Faulkner – Essayreview.co.uk Old Man is something of an adventure story When a flood ravages the countryside of the lower Mississippi, a convict finds himself adrift with a pregnant woman Old Man is something of an adventure story When a flood ravages the countryside of the lower Mississippi, a convict finds himself adrift with a pregnant woman.


About the Author: William Faulkner

William Cuthbert Faulkner was a Nobel Prize winning American novelist and short story writer One of the most influential writers of the twentieth century, his reputation is based mostly on his novels, novellas, and short stories He was also a published poet and an occasional screenwriterThe majority of his works are set in his native state of Mississippi Though his work was published as early as , and largely during the s and s, Faulkner was relatively unknown until receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature, for his powerful and artistically unique contribution to the modern American novel The Old MOBI :Á Faulkner has often been cited as one of the most important writers in the history of American literature Faulkner was influenced by European modernism, and employed stream of consciousness in several of his novels.


10 thoughts on “The Old Man

  1. says:

    Faulkner is some kind of author, constructing these gorgeous, intense, lavishly long and winding sentences full of commas and semicolons my favorite and parentheses and interesting adjectives and surprising offhand observations that still give one pause to think on one s own experiences and how they connect with those offhand observations so casually made yet so often ringing with a certain timeless and often sad truth and somewhat dismissive bits of characterization that don t feel so dism Faulkner is some kind of author, constructing these gorgeous, intense, lavishly long and winding sentences full of commas and semicolons my favorite and parentheses and interesting adjectives and surprising offhand observations that still give one pause to think on one s own experiences and how they connect with those offhand observations so casually made yet so often ringing with a certain timeless and often sad truth and somewhat dismissive bits of characterization that don t feel so dismissive once one again pauses although it is hard to pause when the sentence goes on for so long, one could get lost and thinks over what was just said because Faulkner doesn t seem like the sort of author who just casually dismisses a character close observation of what he is trying to say is of paramount importance and a narrative that ebbs and flows, starts and stops clearly the narrative is not the most important thing in his stories He is like a talkative lover who wants to talk and talk and talk about their love and their passion and who wants to try all sorts of new things, who wants to take you into their world, surround you, just really take you over I m not usually into those kinds of lovers but they and Faulkner can be so overwhelming that my defenses are forced down and I have to do things in a new way, their way and his way, and in the end it s not a bad experience, but it is their experience that I have become a part of as I said, it s distinctly like being taken over, at least temporarily Faulkner doesn t make things easy for his readers, he wants them to live in his world and in his mind and so his passion and ease and experimentation with language including a first for me parentheticals that cross two paragraphs I m not sure I ve come across such a thing before, certainly not something I recall from reading Faulkner in the past, in high school, with the fearsome and possibly senile southern belle Mrs Durham, rest in peace.Ah, Mrs Durham A terrible person in many ways, but hearing her lavish praise of Light in August day after day, despite her students decided lack of interest, made me realize that passion can be expressed for many things, including and perhaps especially for books and his desire to immerse his readers in his worlds by challenging them with that one would almost say berserkly baroque use of language, that kind of storytelling, vivid and visceral yet loose and casual too, it is like a delicious provocation that a person like me, who likes challenges, certainly cannot resist Faulkner s style is like the Old Man River of this novella s title a force to be reckoned with a flood that just sweeps and pulls everything inside of it, your will be damned Old Man swept me away for a little while, but it was at times a distancing experience as well, characters who made some kind of sense to me but characters that are still unknowable by the end, despite all of the words words words And despite all of the words words words, these characters barely talk Everyone locked in their stony worlds, their barred cells where they follow their own rules and things like empathy and kindness are never given, man that journey down the river, the people our convict and our pregnant lady come across, the lack of compassion, I could barely understand it why can t the people in Old Man and why can t people in general just show some goddamned mercy I didn t understand it until in one terrible flood of understanding I did understand it I m like those people too, especially that trio on the boat who refuse to shelter our convict and our pregnant lady, clearly in dire straits and out in terrible, life endangering weather, they showed compassion in their own way by giving some food but they didn t take in our convict and our pregnant lady on the verge of giving birth just as I didn t take that poor homeless guy and his cat on a leash huddled in a doorway in either, not when I see them in the sunlight nor when I saw them last night in the torrential rain and terrible cold while on my way home from the store, all I can do is spare some change and maybe pick up some cat food for him, but the thing is, I could have, there s room in my basement, not the best accommodations but it is outside of the fucking rain and cold, but no, I m not going to do that, I m going to walk on and feel sad and help out in a small way that doesn t matter much but I m not a bad person, not really, and so I realized these people are not bad people either, and what does that mean anyway, they are just people who are looking out for themselves and don t want to compromise their world and that s like me and the convict and the pregnant lady too, we all live our own lives and follow the rules of our own worlds, even when we could do otherwise, we do what we know and stick with what we know and so after all of his adventures and his amazing bravery in protecting our pregnant lady, at the end our convict is back in his jail cell, not much the worse for wear, and he s happy to be back in the box where he feels the most comfortable, where he understands who he is Just as I m happy in the box where I m comfortable Personally I don t think Faulkner believes in these boxes well, he respects them in his own way, and he doesn t hold the fact of the box against the person who lives in that box, but I doubt he believes they are necessary to truly living a life He s too outside of the box to think that way, I think.9 of 16 in Sixteen Short Novels

  2. says:

    Replace Sisyphus with a simpleton convict, his boulder with a pregnant woman in a skiff, and the hill with a wall of water and you have Faulkner s The Old Man It s just as thrilling as that sounds Thank goodness it s short.2.5 stars

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  4. says:

    This work was originally the second half of the novel entitled, The Wild Palms, which was also the name of the first half of the novel Later, Faulkner was dissatisfied with the work as a whole, feeling that the second half was much stronger, and published the second half, reviewed here, as a stand alone work.The Old Man is the River, the Mississippi, at the time of a record breaking flood in 1927 The characters in this novella are not named, referred to only as the tall convict and the plump c This work was originally the second half of the novel entitled, The Wild Palms, which was also the name of the first half of the novel Later, Faulkner was dissatisfied with the work as a whole, feeling that the second half was much stronger, and published the second half, reviewed here, as a stand alone work.The Old Man is the River, the Mississippi, at the time of a record breaking flood in 1927 The characters in this novella are not named, referred to only as the tall convict and the plump convict, the main character being the river itself and the vast flooded plain that includes it, Faulkner bringing it to life in its moods and its personality The story is straightforward a convict is sent in a skiff during the flood to rescue a pregnant woman in a tree, after which he and the woman are blown downriver and she ultimately gives birth For a number of weeks the convict works his way back to the prison farm, bringing skiff and woman with him, finally turning himself in and receiving ten additional years to his sentence for having escaped It is a story of honor and the lure of security, of fate and irony, of man s implacable perseverance against impossible odds, and finally of choice and values This is a story that lingers long in the reader s mind and memory, Faulkner having created a world circumscribed yet universal, specific but plumbing depths of commonality, a masterful achievement

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  6. says:

    I m not going to say I absolutely disliked this book because it s not the case It s just nearly the case If it was not for the extremely bright and wise way it was written I mean, vocabulary wise I would have hated its guts It s so damn fucking boring , like boring to the core I had a hard time trying to focus on this one The story is just so bland I don t fucking care about floods in the Mississippi and I didn t like the fact that none of the characters had names they were I m not going to say I absolutely disliked this book because it s not the case It s just nearly the case If it was not for the extremely bright and wise way it was written I mean, vocabulary wise I would have hated its guts It s so damn fucking boring , like boring to the core I had a hard time trying to focus on this one The story is just so bland I don t fucking care about floods in the Mississippi and I didn t like the fact that none of the characters had names they were just called forced labored person n 1 and n 2 and n 3 lol, not exactly like that, but close Maybe I got it, yeah, they were dehumanized because they lived in such conditions, but even so Common And yes, this revived my memories of another book I have read, oh yes that one Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad All the journey through the river was quite similar and uneventful and quite frankly just sad And I guess I m just writing this with such reversed passion because, man it s FAULKNER IT S WILLIAM FUCKING FAULKNER I wanted to read this guy since forever And what I get in return Fucking boring trips in the floods of a river Dang I don t get it If you got it please get back at me Anyway, I m still eager to read As I lay Dying, because and I repeat IT S WILLIAM FUCKING FAULKNER So of course he deserves a second chance in my book

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  8. says:

    Taking place in the great 1927 Mississippi flood, the hero of this story is a prisoner who is assigned to save a pregnant women who has been spotted up a tree somewhere in the flooded plain After saving her the strong currents prevent them from returning and the three of them the convict, the women, and her newborn son travel down the Mississippi while being presumed dead by the authorities But the hero s sense of duty is such that he tries to get back and return the mother and child to the Taking place in the great 1927 Mississippi flood, the hero of this story is a prisoner who is assigned to save a pregnant women who has been spotted up a tree somewhere in the flooded plain After saving her the strong currents prevent them from returning and the three of them the convict, the women, and her newborn son travel down the Mississippi while being presumed dead by the authorities But the hero s sense of duty is such that he tries to get back and return the mother and child to the authorities, which he finally manages to do, receiving an additional ten years sentence for the presumed attempted escape

  9. says:

    Comeca e termina muito bem Pelo meio tanto h descri es de um meio que pouco ou nada conhe o o ecossistema do Mississippi, digamos como passagens carregadas somente de puro exibicionismo lingu stico, mais demonstrativo no uso de palavras caras do que na subtileza no desenvolvimento das situa es N o fosse isso e esta novela relativamente curta n o teria dado por vezes uma sensa o de sofrimento ao virar das p ginas Coisa que n o senti, pelo contr rio, no nico outro livro de Faulkner que l Comeca e termina muito bem Pelo meio tanto h descri es de um meio que pouco ou nada conhe o o ecossistema do Mississippi, digamos como passagens carregadas somente de puro exibicionismo lingu stico, mais demonstrativo no uso de palavras caras do que na subtileza no desenvolvimento das situa es N o fosse isso e esta novela relativamente curta n o teria dado por vezes uma sensa o de sofrimento ao virar das p ginas Coisa que n o senti, pelo contr rio, no nico outro livro de Faulkner que li, o magn fico O Som e a F ria

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