Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity

Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity
    Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity back the untold history of dementia, from the story of Solomon Fuller, a black doctor whose research at the turn of the twentieth century anticipated important aspects of what we know about dementia today, to what has been gained and lost with the recent bonanza of funding for Alzheimer s at the expense of other forms of the disease In demystifying dementia, Dr Powell helps us understand it with clearer eyes, from the point of view of both physician and caregiver Ultimately, she wants us all to know that dementia is not only about loss it s also about the preservation of dignity and hope."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 320 pages
  • Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End
  • Tia Powell
  • 15 April 2017
  • 073521090X

Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End➺ [Download] ➶ Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End By Tia Powell ➻ – Essayreview.co.uk The cultural and medical history of dementia and Alzheimer s disease by a leading psychiatrist and bioethicist who urges us to turn our focus from cure to care Despite being a physician and a bioethic The cultural and medical history of Building a PDF/EPUB é dementia and Alzheimer s disease by a leading psychiatrist and bioethicist who urges us to turn our focus from cure to care Despite being a physician and a bioethicist, Tia Powell wasn t prepared to address the challenges she faced when her grandmother, and then her mother, were diagnosed with dementia Dementia Reimagined: PDF/EPUB ² not to mention confronting the hard truth that her own odds aren t great In the US , baby boomers turnevery day by the time a person reaches , their chances of having dementia approachpercent And the truth is, there is no cure, and none coming soon, despite the perpetual promises by pharmaceutical companies that they are just Reimagined: Building a PDF/EPUB À one expensive study away from a pill Dr Powell s goal is to move the conversation away from an exclusive focus on cure to a genuine appreciation of care what we can do for those who have dementia, and how to keep life meaningful and even joyful Reimagining Dementia is a moving combination of medicine and memoir, peeling back the untold history of dementia, from the story of Solomon Fuller, a black doctor whose research at the turn of the twentieth century anticipated important aspects of what we know about dementia today, to what has been gained and lost with the recent bonanza of funding for Alzheimer s at the expense of other forms of the disease In demystifying dementia, Dr Powell helps us understand it with clearer eyes, from the point of view of both physician and caregiver Ultimately, she wants us all to know that dementia is not only about loss it s also about the preservation of dignity and hope.


About the Author: Tia Powell

Is a well known author, some Building a PDF/EPUB é of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End book, this is one of the most wanted Tia Powell author readers around the world.


10 thoughts on “Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End

  1. says:

    Absolutely fantastic The perfect blend of sarcasm, sass and wit that I m looking for when talking about the state of aging and care for older adults in the United States Dementia Reimagined covers the history of treatment of dementia in the United States and abroad in a way that I haven t come across in the many many books I ve read on dementia I love that she spoke about Dr Fuller, an African American research who came to a lot of the same conclusions about Alzheimer s that we are coming to Absolutely fantastic The perfect blend of sarcasm, sass and wit that I m looking for when talking about the state of aging and care for older adults in the United States Dementia Reimagined covers the history of treatment of dementia in the United States and abroad in a way that I haven t come across in the many many books I ve read on dementia I love that she spoke about Dr Fuller, an African American research who came to a lot of the same conclusions about Alzheimer s that we are coming to now but was basically completely ignored in his time probably due to racism Dr Powell tackles some of the difficult issues that those living with dementia and their families end up facing like is downsizing really a better option, but how can you age in place while also affording medical care while also doing what is best for the person while also acknowledging autonomy And what happens when an older adult develops dementia and becomes violent How do long term care facilities handle sexual relationships between older adults when one person has dementia spoiler alert, they don t handle it well even when neither has dementia.Dementia Reimagined very quickly jumped to the top of my favorite books on dementia list I ve already recommended it to everyone I work with in aging and will continue to do so until they ve all read it.Highly recommend

  2. says:

    I m really glad I read this especially the second half In the first half of the book, Powell outlines the history of the definitions treatment course cultural understanding of dementia and Alzheimer s disease She writes well and accessibly but while the history is good to understand, it was less compelling than the second half The point of outlining the history of treatment is to support her argument that we need to divert resources from only focusing on cure to focusing on care As baby b I m really glad I read this especially the second half In the first half of the book, Powell outlines the history of the definitions treatment course cultural understanding of dementia and Alzheimer s disease She writes well and accessibly but while the history is good to understand, it was less compelling than the second half The point of outlining the history of treatment is to support her argument that we need to divert resources from only focusing on cure to focusing on care As baby boomers age, and live longer, a large fraction of us will get some form of dementia How can that best be managed both culturally and individually Powell advocates a proactive approach from preparing a playlist of favorite songs now to be used when dementia rears it s ugly head to thinking about what brings joy and how to do those things at a less cognitively challenging level Do you love to read Think about having children s books around to enjoy Powell offers practical advice and doesn t shy away from raising the issues of sex, driving and money handling as dementia progresses I also appreciated her straight forward chapter about what it s like and how to best prepare for dying from dementia Powell offers no easy answers but much food for thought

  3. says:

    Author Dr Tina Powell discusses dementia She points out that costs won t go down, they will go up no matter what Care needs to be better and treatment will costForcing people to become poor to get care is not a good thing Closing nursing homes and limiting care for people in their homes is a recipe for disaster similar to emptying psychiatric hospitals were with little community care The US needs to think of a better way.

  4. says:

    As someone caring for a person with dementia, I hoped for a bitfrom this book The bulk of the early part is a history of mental illness and its treatments, both medical and societal This was familiar from other works on mental illness, with a few exceptions, including the notable story of Solomon Fuller Fuller s research refuted many of the current hypotheses about the causes of Alzheimer s and dementia However, he was dismissed and ultimately forgotten, in the main because he was Afri As someone caring for a person with dementia, I hoped for a bitfrom this book The bulk of the early part is a history of mental illness and its treatments, both medical and societal This was familiar from other works on mental illness, with a few exceptions, including the notable story of Solomon Fuller Fuller s research refuted many of the current hypotheses about the causes of Alzheimer s and dementia However, he was dismissed and ultimately forgotten, in the main because he was African American The middle portion of the book is a repetitive middle that neededediting than it apparently received The last third of the book is the most useful, suggesting ways to face a diagnosis of dementia Here Powell offers an approach that is most helpful before or early in the illness It is less helpful for someone caring for a person with dementia, though I do find her focus on caring that seeks to ensure comfort very helpful Anyone who has someone close who is descending into dementia or Alzheimer s may find bits of useful information here

  5. says:

    This book is extremely informative about the history of treatment for mental illness, the place of dementia and Alzheimers in that history, the distinction between those two, and the story and status of the search for treatment Powell is a psychiatrist and doctor who has a history of Alzheimers dementia in her family and thus knows she has a good chance of also having it, so she investigated it thoroughly She makes it very clear that everything we ve done so far to try to resolve this problem This book is extremely informative about the history of treatment for mental illness, the place of dementia and Alzheimers in that history, the distinction between those two, and the story and status of the search for treatment Powell is a psychiatrist and doctor who has a history of Alzheimers dementia in her family and thus knows she has a good chance of also having it, so she investigated it thoroughly She makes it very clear that everything we ve done so far to try to resolve this problem has been focused on finding a cure, and no attention has been paid to how to do better care which is sort of a waste, because after 50 years orof research, there is no cure and our ability to do the care is really bad It seems that half of baby boomers will have dementia and will need care because there is no cure Her answer to this is to stop pouring billions into searching for a cure and put some resources toward improving care, because care is what s going to be needed for millions and millions of people now and over the next 20 years Public policy s institutions yes institutions no shlllyshally has been based entirely on the need to reduce what s spent on this problem as is everything in the United States, it seems everyone wants everything including good care for themselves, but nobody wants to give any money toward it.She is particularly clear and eloquent on the situations of the people she profiles, and the difficult flex point when they are no longer safe at home either for themselves or for the people around them She is not starry eyed about the aging in place concept she totally agrees that a nursing home is the best place for a lot of people, and makes it clear that nursing homes have improved by orders of magnitude in the past 40 years She finally spends some pages thinking about what proper dementia care should look like what caregivers and institutions should strive for and what they should not waste time on and what she wants when she is ready to receive such care She makes the point that some people are much better in a good institutional setting, because there is activity and society and other people.Because my mother refused to leave her home until she reached the point of not being able to stay there, she was basically completely alone for 12 years after my father died, and this was fine with her as she didn t like people This is deadly for the human brain I don t want to travel that road myself when, as is likely, this illness comes upon me I hope I know the right time to move even though I love my house, and I do like people Like the woman said, whom I saw on TV, who is 92 and holds the senior record for various track running distances, JUST KEEP MOVING

  6. says:

    A valuable read for anyone dealing with a loved one with dementia or Alzheimers, or for anyone contemplating a future with either of these conditions The book starts off with a history of institutionalized care for the mentally ill, which many years ago, included elders with dementia At first, I found myself frustrated with the inclusion of this and wanted the book to get on with today, but it became clear further on that the past informs the present Together, my husband and I have 3 parents A valuable read for anyone dealing with a loved one with dementia or Alzheimers, or for anyone contemplating a future with either of these conditions The book starts off with a history of institutionalized care for the mentally ill, which many years ago, included elders with dementia At first, I found myself frustrated with the inclusion of this and wanted the book to get on with today, but it became clear further on that the past informs the present Together, my husband and I have 3 parents currently living with dementia or Alzheimers The details presented in this book paint an accurate portrait of our experiences The author presents an update into Alzheimers research and an explanation for why progress towards a cure has been so slow.I listened to the audio version of this book The first and last chapters are read by the author, with the middle chapters read by someone else I intensly disliked hearing the author read her book, as she way over dramatized her points I had such a problem with this that I wondered if I could actually get through the audio version, but stuck with it because I had paid for it Luckily, unexpected relief came when another voice took over.The book is well written and thoughtful Overall, I enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone

  7. says:

    So disappointing Really nothing for those of us who are dealing with someone else s dementia and trying to find the way to treat them and give them joy and dignity to the end of their lives First came a history of how dementia ws treated inthe past, either as simple aging or as madness mental illlness and confinement in mental institutions Then she went right into how she wants to be treated if she has dementia Totally unrealistic Waste of my time.

  8. says:

    The author explores the way society has looked at dementia through the past centuries She is a bioethicist with common sense who expects to herself get dementia because of her genetics.She writes about her concerns related to our society s failure to create a realistic national policy to provide and pay for dementia care There is no pill to stave off or cure it.The author states in Chapter 8, Dementia creates a lot of anxiety, as do thoughts of aging in general It doesn t have to be that way The author explores the way society has looked at dementia through the past centuries She is a bioethicist with common sense who expects to herself get dementia because of her genetics.She writes about her concerns related to our society s failure to create a realistic national policy to provide and pay for dementia care There is no pill to stave off or cure it.The author states in Chapter 8, Dementia creates a lot of anxiety, as do thoughts of aging in general It doesn t have to be that way Take a walk Spend time with those you love Sing Eat fruits Pick up a new skill or hobby There is no guarantee these things will slow dementia s onset, but they are as good a bet as any No matter what, they may increase your store of happiness along the way The final chapter is definitely worth readingthan once

  9. says:

    Good book I heard her interviewed on Fresh Air awhile back I found it difficult to read in some parts which is why I gave it 4 stars not because of the subject matter, butdue to her conversational style of writing There is a lot on the history of dementia treatment and current research, the latter of which I often skimmed She does a great job in relating how our current healthcare system sometimes, maybe often, fails dementia patients in trying to cure them of a condition that is Good book I heard her interviewed on Fresh Air awhile back I found it difficult to read in some parts which is why I gave it 4 stars not because of the subject matter, butdue to her conversational style of writing There is a lot on the history of dementia treatment and current research, the latter of which I often skimmed She does a great job in relating how our current healthcare system sometimes, maybe often, fails dementia patients in trying to cure them of a condition that is not curable and 100% fatal We need to change that thinking to comfort care make the person as comfortable as possible We also need manygeriatricians and geriatric specialists who can really focus on the condition and other ailments of the elderly.I think my favorite part is the last chapter where she describes a good death for herself Dementia isn t a condition any of us wish for, but far too many develop I hope my survivors can handle me if it comes to that I will do my best to provide my wishes to them

  10. says:

    The first half of the book delves into the history and progression in recognizing Dementia The second half goesinto detail on what dementia care can look like as well as the political part of research associated with Alzheimer s disease The last 3 chapters were the hardest for me to read What does a good life with dementia look like And what does a good ending of life with dementia look like I think it is a good book I needdetails of how a dementia person looks like and how to The first half of the book delves into the history and progression in recognizing Dementia The second half goesinto detail on what dementia care can look like as well as the political part of research associated with Alzheimer s disease The last 3 chapters were the hardest for me to read What does a good life with dementia look like And what does a good ending of life with dementia look like I think it is a good book I needdetails of how a dementia person looks like and how to deal with it She did give me some resources for future reading

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