Wandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great
    Wandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great throughout our history Through interviews, photos, and hundreds of pages of transcription, Jerkins braids the loose threads of her family s oral histories, which she was able to trace backyears, with the insights and recollections of black people she met along the way the tissue of black myths, customs, and blood that connect the bones of American historyIncisive and illuminating, Wandering in Strange Lands is a timely and enthralling look at America s past and present, one family s legacy, and a young black woman s life, filtered through her sharp and curious eyes."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 304 pages
  • Wandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her Roots
  • Morgan Jerkins
  • 28 March 2017
  • 0062873040

Wandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her Roots❰Read❯ ➳ Wandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her Roots Author Morgan Jerkins – Essayreview.co.uk One of the smartest young writers of her generation Book RiotFrom the acclaimed cultural critic and New York Times bestselling author of This Will Be My Undoing a writer whom Roxane Gay has hailed as One of the smartest young writers of Strange Lands: PDF/EPUB ì her generation Book RiotFrom the acclaimed cultural critic and New York Times bestselling author of This Will Be My Undoing a writer whom Roxane Gay has hailed as a force to be reckoned with comes this powerful story of her journey to understand her northern and southern roots, the Great Migration, and the displacement of Wandering in PDF/EPUB ² black people across AmericaBetweenand , six million black Americans left their rural homes in the South for jobs in cities in the North, West, and Midwest in a movement known as The Great Migration But while this event transformed the complexion of America and provided black people with new economic opportunities, it also disconnected them from their roots, their land, and their sense in Strange Lands: eBook ☆ of identity, argues Morgan Jerkins In this fascinating and deeply personal exploration, she recreates her ancestors journeys across America, following the migratory routes they took from Georgia and South Carolina to Louisiana, Oklahoma, and CaliforniaFollowing in their footsteps, Jerkins seeks to understand not only her own past, but the lineage of an entire group of people who have been displaced, disenfranchised, and disrespected throughout our history Through interviews, photos, and hundreds of pages of transcription, Jerkins braids the loose threads of her family s oral histories, which she was able to trace backyears, with the insights and recollections of black people she met along the way the tissue of black myths, customs, and blood that connect the bones of American historyIncisive and illuminating, Wandering in Strange Lands is a timely and enthralling look at America s past and present, one family s legacy, and a young black woman s life, filtered through her sharp and curious eyes.


About the Author: Morgan Jerkins

Morgan Jerkins is the author of the Strange Lands: PDF/EPUB ì New York Times bestseller, This Will Be My Undoing Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in White America and the forthcoming Wandering In Strange Lands A Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her RootsA graduate of Princeton University and the Bennington Writing Seminars, Jerkins is the current Senior Editor at ZORA of Wandering in PDF/EPUB ² Medium and former Associate Editor at Catapult She teaches at Columbia University s School of the Arts and most recently was the Picador Professor at Leipzig University in GermanyShe s based in Harlem.


10 thoughts on “Wandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her Roots

  1. says:

    Morgan Jerkins had heard her family s many stories and histories throughout her life but over time she began to wonder how those tales, folk sayings, etc might relate to the reality of her background Just who were her people By tracing the Great Migration in reverse and tracking specific parts of both paternal and maternal forebears, she creates a portrait of black life in America post slavery that is likely relevant for many Black people in this country The author physically travels to are Morgan Jerkins had heard her family s many stories and histories throughout her life but over time she began to wonder how those tales, folk sayings, etc might relate to the reality of her background Just who were her people By tracing the Great Migration in reverse and tracking specific parts of both paternal and maternal forebears, she creates a portrait of black life in America post slavery that is likely relevant for many Black people in this country The author physically travels to areas from her family s past, as close to specific sites as possible, and locates as many records as possible She also finds local experts on the people and history Her first destination was the Low Country of Georgia and South Carolina And the Gullah Geechee people who have lived on coastal islands and were able to maintain many African practices She researched the starting points for those who migrated to Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, like her mother s family and found Georgia Her father was from North Carolina but tracing earlier migration patterns took Jerkins to Louisiana and to a much better understanding of Creole culture From there she follows displaced slaves, freedmen and Indians to Oklahoma, the land at the end of the Trail of Tears The mix of people and cultures here became a battle of sorts that is still unsettled.Lastly, she trailed those who continued to seek a better life and headed for California For me, this was perhaps the hardest and harshest part of the saga Here there were few, if any, good endings, rare acquisitions of homes and properties More often there were those who were redlined out of good neighborhoods, pushed into jobs with no future, living in Los Angeles, a city with a history of racist police Reading this book at this time in our country s history feels right and powerful The final section about Watts, South Central LA, etc, was eye opening This was written in 2019 for publication now What timing While it approaches black experience through a personal filter, it also deals with general experiences While I am white and have not had the same life experiences, I am also interested in genealogy and my forbears I am glad I had the opportunity to read this book and learn.A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review

  2. says:

    I was seven years old when I learned that I wasn t my father s only daughter This is the line that opens Morgan Jerkins sopho novel and sets us up for a historical look into her family tree Morgan sets out to understandabout her family s history, where they came from, why they left and why they settle where they did Jerkins holds nothing back, she is unafraid of learningabout her history and this was a genuine look I really enjoyed reading this, I feel like I can relate to J I was seven years old when I learned that I wasn t my father s only daughter This is the line that opens Morgan Jerkins sopho novel and sets us up for a historical look into her family tree Morgan sets out to understandabout her family s history, where they came from, why they left and why they settle where they did Jerkins holds nothing back, she is unafraid of learningabout her history and this was a genuine look I really enjoyed reading this, I feel like I can relate to Jerkin s family in a way As someone who is always asking about my family history and is constantly met with why you want to know thats how how its always been etc it felt good to see someone win at looking into their history I also felt like this book reignited my interest into researchingabout my family A well researched and written book I also learned sooo much One things I learned reading this book It is important to remember that Louisiana was not originally a part of the United States

  3. says:

    This is a solid well researched book I learned a ton More thoughts to come.

  4. says:

    Note I received an advanced reader copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley Morgan Jerkins investigation of her ancestors ended up becoming almost as much an avalanche of revelations to me as it was for her With every branch of the family that she thoroughly explored through visits, research, and interviews, she ended up revealing a flood of information about some facet of the black experience in America that was either little known to this reader, such as the Creoles of the Gulf or black Ind Note I received an advanced reader copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley Morgan Jerkins investigation of her ancestors ended up becoming almost as much an avalanche of revelations to me as it was for her With every branch of the family that she thoroughly explored through visits, research, and interviews, she ended up revealing a flood of information about some facet of the black experience in America that was either little known to this reader, such as the Creoles of the Gulf or black Indians, or completely unknown I became particularly aware of my own knowledge gaps when Jerkins examined roots among her Gullah ancestors of the Lowcountry in Hilton Head a place I have vacationed with my family and had absolutely no idea was the center of a distinct subgroup and their unique culture until now.If you are confused by any of what I have referred to, then definitely be sure to keep an eye out for when Wandering in Strange Lands arrives at your library or bookstore so that you yourself may take this eye opening journey through the past alongside its author

  5. says:

    A memoir cultural history combined Jerkins explores the Great Migration of Black folks from the south to the north through her own family s lineage From the south lands of South Carolina Georgia, to Louisiana and Oklahoma I listened to an ALC of this book courtesy of Libro.fm, and tbh, I think this has made its way into one of my fave reads of the year I loved it so much that I fully intend to buy a physical copy for my bookshelf In the audiobook, Jerkins narrates her own book, and as u A memoir cultural history combined Jerkins explores the Great Migration of Black folks from the south to the north through her own family s lineage From the south lands of South Carolina Georgia, to Louisiana and Oklahoma I listened to an ALC of this book courtesy of Libro.fm, and tbh, I think this has made its way into one of my fave reads of the year I loved it so much that I fully intend to buy a physical copy for my bookshelf In the audiobook, Jerkins narrates her own book, and as usual, I m a sucker for it, but also, her narration was genuinely so inviting I learned so much while reading this, and kept questioning why I learned little to nothing about the great migration in school, or idk, the fact that there were free Black people living in Louisiana before it was a member of the United States If you re interested at all in cultural anthropology or Black history, pick this one up

  6. says:

    This book is an entirely different animal from Jerkins s first book, THIS WILL BE MY UNDOING Coming into it expecting the same kind of writing might be disappointing to readers I wish I hadn t had the ghost of that book hanging over me as I read this one In THIS WILL BE MY UNDOING, Jerkins made herself vulnerable and laid herself open it s a deeply insightful and moving series of personal refections on her experiences as a young black woman in America This book is not nearly so focused on t This book is an entirely different animal from Jerkins s first book, THIS WILL BE MY UNDOING Coming into it expecting the same kind of writing might be disappointing to readers I wish I hadn t had the ghost of that book hanging over me as I read this one In THIS WILL BE MY UNDOING, Jerkins made herself vulnerable and laid herself open it s a deeply insightful and moving series of personal refections on her experiences as a young black woman in America This book is not nearly so focused on the self, and Jerkins does not open herself in the same way Part memoir and part history, it s an exploration of the effects of movement and migration on black America, and specifically, how Jerkins s own family fits into the larger picture.There s so much to chew on here In order to discoverabout her own roots and her ancestors, Jerkins, who grew up in New Jersey, the daughter of people who came north during the Great Migration, travels across the country visiting and interviewing black folks in many locales She visits the Gullah Geechee people on the coast of Georgia, Creole folk in Louisiana, and African Americans with complex kinship ties to Cherokee and Seminole people in Oklahoma The stories she tells are fascinating and important in and of themselves, as all of her encounters help to illuminate pieces of America history that are often neglected Using these visits as stepping off points, she delves into the complex histories of race and family in America She asks big questions about the importance of blood and DNA in determining identity, and about the ways that labels and definitions are often murkier that we think, and can cause their own kind of harm The section on Creole people, and how Creole identity has been been defined differently throughout was especially thoughtful.If I had not read her earlier book, I would have left it at that This is a fabulous historical case study rooted in the history of one family But I found myself seeking the kind of openness Jerkins displayed in her first book of essays This is certainly a personal story, and Jerkins does get into the ways that learning about her family s messy history changed the way she thought about herself But her own story sometimes felt like an afterthought a framing device rather than something central Perhaps the book was trying to do too much at once.That said, this was still a smart and engaging read and has left me with plenty to think about The audiobook, which Jerkins narrates, is wonderful She s got a direct and very matter of fact way of speaking that draws you in as a listener I ll continue to read anything she writes

  7. says:

    This wasn t the book for me Exploring her genealogy of which she knows little about, Jerkins travels to the south to explore different African American communities and their ways of life I read about half the book before abandoning it I liked reading about the different communities Gullah Geechee off the coast of South Carolina, Creoles in Louisiana but was less interested in the author s own family tree and how she personally felt about her ancestors Readersinterested in genealogy a This wasn t the book for me Exploring her genealogy of which she knows little about, Jerkins travels to the south to explore different African American communities and their ways of life I read about half the book before abandoning it I liked reading about the different communities Gullah Geechee off the coast of South Carolina, Creoles in Louisiana but was less interested in the author s own family tree and how she personally felt about her ancestors Readersinterested in genealogy and African American history will probably enjoy this muchthan I did

  8. says:

    With this book, I hope to help Black people to regain their narratives and recontextualize the shame that has been pressed upon our hearts from time immemorial We are here because we are in perpetual motion, our migratory patterns rivaling those of birds I do not believe that there is a promised land for us in America, I am disappointed that I could not find a happier end for these pages, but you and I know that the promised land does not exist Racism abides in all zip codes on every migrato With this book, I hope to help Black people to regain their narratives and recontextualize the shame that has been pressed upon our hearts from time immemorial We are here because we are in perpetual motion, our migratory patterns rivaling those of birds I do not believe that there is a promised land for us in America, I am disappointed that I could not find a happier end for these pages, but you and I know that the promised land does not exist Racism abides in all zip codes on every migratory route if we are the promised land, then that means that you, yes you, exist on a plane larger than your eyes can see Home is wherever we decide to settle but our truest space is one another

  9. says:

    This book is worth your preorder I learned things about things that I didn t even know I didn t even know And I think hearing it all from the perspective of Morgan Jerkins as she searches for the truth of her family makes it all theriveting.

  10. says:

    As an avid family historian, I appreciated this book I am not African American, so Wandering in Strange Lands was educational for me Well researched, with the right balance of fact and personal narrative I would suggest this book to anyone interested in family history, African American culture history, or the American South Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.

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