[Read Epub] ☨ Blue Ticket ♵ Essayreview.co.uk

Sounds like a cross between Handmaid s Tale and The Giver The thing is, bookshops are over packed with feminist dystopias obsessing about babies and motherhood Yes, reproductive rights remain a contested issue but Atwood nailed the topic and this feels like one of many, many also rans I loved the twisted fairy tale aura of The Water Cure but this feels unoriginal in comparison It s hard to buy into the simplistic premise that has minimal world building to convince and the writing is merely workmanlike Overall, this lacks conviction and energy di The thing is, bookshops are over packed with feminist dystopias obsessing about babies and motherhood Yes, reproductive rights remain a contested issue but Atwood nailed the topic and this feels like one of many, many also rans I loved the twisted fairy tale aura of The Water Cure but this feels unoriginal in comparison It s hard to buy into the simplistic premise that has minimal world building to convince and the writing is merely workmanlike Overall, this lacks conviction and energy disappointingly flabby with little tension or drive.ARC from NetGalley [Read Epub] ⚉ Blue Ticket ⚖ In A World Where Women Can T Have It All, Don T Underestimate The Relief Of A Decision Being Taken Away From YouCalla Knows How The Lottery Works Everyone Does On The Day Of Your First Bleed, You Report To The Station To Learn What Kind Of Woman You Will Be A White Ticket Grants You Marriage And Children A Blue Ticket Grants You A Career And Freedom You Are Relieved Of The Terrible Burden Of Choice And Once You Ve Taken Your Ticket, There Is No Going Back But What If The Life You Re Given Is The Wrong One When Calla, A Blue Ticket Woman, Begins To Question Her Fate, She Must Go On The Run But Her Survival Will Be Dependent On The Very Qualities The Lottery Has Taught Her To Question In Herself And On The Other Women The System Has Pitted Against Her Pregnant And Desperate, Calla Must Contend With Whether Or Not The Lottery Knows Her Better Than She Knows Herself And What That Might Mean For Her Child An Urgent Inquiry Into Free Will, Social Expectation, And The Fraught Space Of Motherhood, Blue Ticket Is Electrifying In Its Raw Evocation And Desire And Riveting In Its Undeniable Familiarity I was really excited about this book and I knew I wanted to read it as soon as I heard about it Much like when reading The Water Cure I easily found myself immersed in the world that Sophie Mackintosh creates I love that you never really know where it s set or what year it is However, another part of me is dying forinformation Specially regarding the lottery and the blue and white tickets.I ve read other books regarding the issue of fertility and women s reproductive rights but found I was really excited about this book and I knew I wanted to read it as soon as I heard about it Much like when reading The Water Cure I easily found myself immersed in the world that Sophie Mackintosh creates I love that you never really know where it s set or what year it is However, another part of me is dying forinformation Specially regarding the lottery and the blue and white tickets.I ve read other books regarding the issue of fertility and women s reproductive rights but found this to be better andinteresting than the others I ve read This isnot fun to read I DNF d about halfway through and couldn t force myself to continue Reasons you would enjoy Blue Ticket You don t like characters or characters talking You are interested in hearing a single character tell you she s sad, but like, for the whole book You are bored by things like world building or character interactions Imagine picking up a diary written by someone from what I would call a mild dystopia That s it That s the book When you are a teenager, you a This isnot fun to read I DNF d about halfway through and couldn t force myself to continue Reasons you would enjoy Blue Ticket You don t like characters or characters talking You are interested in hearing a single character tell you she s sad, but like, for the whole book You are bored by things like world building or character interactions Imagine picking up a diary written by someone from what I would call a mild dystopia That s it That s the book When you are a teenager, you are given a ticket that will determine whether you are childless or will bare children The set up to the book and the reason for the dystopia is purposefully vague for what I assume is dramatic affect, but mostly comes off as frustrating There is almost no dialogue Most of this story is a woman walking us through her life with minimal details The book hops time regularly within chapters which will sometimes be multiple pages of monologues describing the way the character feels about an everyday situation I just found this ton be a frustrating execution of a concept that I was thrilled to read If you like poetry or artsy books that are extremely limited in character interaction, maybe this will work for you I don t usually DNF this quickly without a reason, and my reason was I was bored to tears and about as compelled by the characters and universe as I am to go to work every day It was tedious and somehow, for a dark feminist dystopia, boring Like listening to your un happy friend repeat her two problems to you for 4 hours straight.You can read a million good dystopias out there, so why waste your time with this There are two paths a girl can take in life, and both are governed by a lottery A white ticket will see her with a baby, a husband, and a loving home A blue ticket will see this future disallowed to her and she will be cast out into the world to make for herself what she can For the teen girls who receive their lottery ticket the latter feels like freedom, but to some of the women they become it feelslike a nightmare.Calla is one such woman She spends her days at repetitive work and he There are two paths a girl can take in life, and both are governed by a lottery A white ticket will see her with a baby, a husband, and a loving home A blue ticket will see this future disallowed to her and she will be cast out into the world to make for herself what she can For the teen girls who receive their lottery ticket the latter feels like freedom, but to some of the women they become it feelslike a nightmare.Calla is one such woman She spends her days at repetitive work and her nights sipping overly sweet wine until the edges of reality blur and fade to black altogether only for a new day to begin and herald a repeat of all those that came before She is looking for something that can t be found in strings of men and women, the cigarettes she chain smokes, or the empty bottles that litter her spare apartment She is looking for the one future the blue ticket held inside her locket forbids her from.I appreciated how this unsettling dystopian tale opened up ideas of femininity and motherhood, and how the two are often wrongly interlinked The women denied the latter are over sexualised and sold a shallow way of living that kept meaningful conversation and loving contact at bay The white ticket women are overly protected from this but are coddled and cosseted in the domestic sphere, instead Maybe some are happy with their fate, but most are too brain washed into thinking no other future is viable, for them to begin to question that.Whilst I adored all this novel set out to do and the startlingly bleak future reality constructed, I found the concept was both the nexus and the entire focus of the novel This was a largely slow paced, personal character study of the protagonist, that used one individual s plight to speak volumes for the untold number of women just like her It was quite like the renowned The Handmaid s Tale in that respect Whilst I understand why the focus was so introspective and individualised I also longed for something else Only I m not exactly sure what it was that was missing for me, personally I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review Thank you to the author, Sophie Mackintosh, and the publisher, Penguin, for this opportunity That s how your life becomes a set thing, written and unchangeable It was an object that did not really belong to me, and to wish for any other was a fallacy at best, treasonous at worst Blue ticket Don t underestimate the relief of a decision being taken away from you Blue ticket I was not motherly It had been judged that it wasn t for me by someone who knew better than I did.Blue ticket There was lack in my brain, my body, my soul, or some thing There was a flaw I should not pass on That s how your life becomes a set thing, written and unchangeable It was an object that did not really belong to me, and to wish for any other was a fallacy at best, treasonous at worst Blue ticket Don t underestimate the relief of a decision being taken away from you Blue ticket I was not motherly It had been judged that it wasn t for me by someone who knew better than I did.Blue ticket There was lack in my brain, my body, my soul, or some thing There was a flaw I should not pass on A warmth I was missing Blue ticket My life was precious enough as it was I wasn t to be risked Blue ticket Some called it a noble sacrifice, others a mercy It meant a different thing every time I thought about it Years were frenetic, then calmer They ticked with the inevitability of a metronome, some fallow and some interesting Things could happen to a blue ticket woman the way they might not for a white ticket Spirit of adventure In practice, life felt smaller than that expansiveness promised The author s debut novel Water Cure was longlisted for the 2018 Booker Prize The book received mixed reviews from those who follow the prize a lot of it in my view based around the book not matching reader s expectations due to its marketing as a feminist dystopia as well as many readers preconceptions biases of what a feminist dystopia should portray.From my review of that booklike many dystopias takes an element of the observed world and extrapolates in an imagined but imaginable way In this case, the book proceeds from toxic masculinity and takes it to a literary as well as literal conclusion unlike many other dystopias which explore their central idea and its implications here the central idea representsof a starting point for a book which is light on exposition and heavy on ambiguity I also compared the book to The Red Clocks by Leni Zumas a book which as I said in my review of that book was about relationships between women explored within a patriarchal misogynistic world rather than just exploring the structure of that patriarchyI suspect, and can see from early reviews, that similar issues may emerge with this book the blurb from Margaret Atwood a year after The Testaments was published along with the basic set up which gives the book its title will and already has given rise to certain unmet expectations.The book is told in the first person by Calla and we start with her around 14, awaiting her first period, a seminal inthan one sense moment in any girls life when this happens they are taken by their parents in Calla s case, her widowed father to a lottery station, where they draw a single ticket issued from a machine a ticket they believe may be ordained based on your observed character and behaviour until then a white ticket and they are given the opportunity and expectation to have children a blue ticket and they are given what is seen as freedom from the burden of motherhood fitted with an IUD, issued with a locket with a blue piece of paper inside, and sent out to make their own way to a City, away from their own family, with only a basic set of supplies We then join Call briefly on her years in the City we later find hints about the dangers faced on the trip to the City where it seems new Blue Ticket women are open season for assault how when they arrive they are subject to a battery of tests and told which kind of jobs they are suitable for Calla we realise from the occasional scenes of clarity which appear in her poetically oblique narrative style which characterises this novel lives a life which is partly constrained and subdued but sometimes with elements of her earlier deliberately provocative self harmful behaviour I no longer asked men the age of my father to hit me in the face of stayed up for three days at a time but Sometimes I would still go out looking for trouble The book then is told over a twelve month period, 18 years after her lottery, beginning with one of the regular compulsory sessions she has with her Doctor part physician, part psychologist, part and explainer of societal norms as they apply to blue ticket women, norms enforced by uniformed emissaries.Calla increasingly is obsessed with obtaining the very thing forbidden to her, not so much because she desires it her practical knowledge as a blue ticket woman of pregnancy, birth, motherhood seems close to non existent but partly because of what she increasingly feels as the hunger and grief of her body for something natural denied to it, and partly particularly as her Doctor sees it because of believing an alternative to her current life will deal with her psychological issues The narrative then proceeds from her decision to remove her IUD, and get pregnant When this happens, Doctor A explains that she will be visited at some stage by emissaries, given a survival kit and in a fairly deliberate echo of the first day of a Blue Ticket woman, given a small head start the length of head start depending on her behaviour up until that point and then hunted down with her fate once captured not entirely clear.This only represents the first quarter or so of the book the remaining 75% or so is Calla s post conception journey The author s own Twitter feed fairfairisles serves as an excellent summary of what the book becomesIt s kind of a road trip novel, it s kind of a pregnancy novel, it s full of old hotels, strange doctors, uncanny landscapes and longingAnd the road trip itself introduces the other key character another pregnant fugitive Marisol, one with a clearer idea of the end aim of the road trip and one whose interactions with Calla give the book its narrative drive, its poignancy and tenderness, its revelations, its coherence of plot and its resolution What we do not get, and what I think will frustrate many readers, especially those nor familiar with the author s style, is a coherent, Margaret Atwood style, exploration of the dystopia It would be easy to list the many seeming inconsistencies or omissions in the set up of the world that is described On one level that would be unfair and based on a misunderstanding of how the book should be read But I think the book may also disappoint some of the author s fans In contrast to The Water Cure where the inconsistency of the world view was one of the book s strengths as it lead to the ambiguity to the reader throughout and to the three girls at the end of the extent to which the regime imposed on them was actually justified here the inconsistencies seem to me to serve no purpose at best they can be ignored and at worst they undermine the story.I think part of this reason is that The Water Cure worked in its isolated island set up where an artificial set up could be maintained And this set up also gave rise to other elements which made the book strong the dark fairy tale echoes, the Shakespearean elements, the tight interactions between the three sisters, the heavy imagery of water and salt, the earth water sky aspects, the environmental concepts All of those are partly echoed here but to me work less well in their societal and road trip setting Where the book does succeed is in retaining the author s distinct writing style a kind of fragmentary and elliptical way of creating impression A style which I enjoy and which would lead me to read her next book My thanks to Hamish Hamilton for an ARC via NetGalley Pain scrunched me up, tiny and ineffectual Then it opened me up at the ribs, the pelvis, like I was being disarticulated on a butcher s block Then it was a horse bolting away from me It was impossible to get a grip on it Soft body learning to be hard on the country roads Gravel wet, steaming air in my nostrils Body of tarmac and hotel rooms and swimming pools and bathrooms and clinics, body of ripped up cuti cles and appetite and sex with people loved and not loved, a body forgiving every bad thing I could do to it A body always going somewhere Carrying me onwards Never letting me down, yet. Incredibly strange and hypnotically beautiful, Blue Ticket was nothing like I expected and I m not mad about it.While reading the first few pages of Blue Ticket, I had a sinking feeling in my stomach The writing style was deeply reserved and flighty I honestly thought I would hate it On any different day I might have But something about it just clicked for me It eschews structure in favor of ephemeral glimpses of thought and feeling It s a novel that really doesn t give a fuck about being Incredibly strange and hypnotically beautiful, Blue Ticket was nothing like I expected and I m not mad about it.While reading the first few pages of Blue Ticket, I had a sinking feeling in my stomach The writing style was deeply reserved and flighty I honestly thought I would hate it On any different day I might have But something about it just clicked for me It eschews structure in favor of ephemeral glimpses of thought and feeling It s a novel that really doesn t give a fuck about being easily readable It considers questions of free will, choice, and destiny but wraps them in a murky shadow of a narrator trapped by both desire and destiny, who so desperately wants to know what she truly wants.What I m getting at is, this book is weird as hell In a way, this reminds me of Bunny it has the same trippy, mesmerizing quality to it It s as much an experience as it is a book Blue Ticket could have been a paint by numbers feminist dystopia Instead it is something altogether weirder andstriking You may love it or hate it, but I ll never forget it Thanks to Edelweiss and Doubleday Books for the review copy Oh no For a long time I didn t give any book two stars and I didn t get disappointed by a book but well you cannot always get what you wish for.For celebrating empowerment of women I chose this reading for this special day and of course that beautiful, haunted, effective cover stole my heart from the first look but as soon as I flip the pages and try to get lost in this dystopian, disturbing, eerie story, I didn t get the special and rare taste that I was looking for Maybe I wanted to be charm Oh no For a long time I didn t give any book two stars and I didn t get disappointed by a book but well you cannot always get what you wish for.For celebrating empowerment of women I chose this reading for this special day and of course that beautiful, haunted, effective cover stole my heart from the first look but as soon as I flip the pages and try to get lost in this dystopian, disturbing, eerie story, I didn t get the special and rare taste that I was looking for Maybe I wanted to be charmed by some special world with its authoritarian manifesto, ruled by a group of despots force the women doing choice without their free will and consent kind of earth shattering, thought provoking reading Especially when I read the promotions indicate this book is some kind of smart Atwood ish masterpiece, it made mecurious and I couldn t wait to get this into my hands.But there are too many things failed me in this book which are Lack of world building I got that story takes place in a dystopian alternated universe and when the girls start to menstruate, they re taken to the hospital to be checked and join the lottery to get their card which will define their future There are two types of future determined by two different colored tickets.BLUE TICKET means they re free because they re not going to mothers They can work and they can contribute to the system.WHITE TICKET means they are not free any They re gonna be mothers and wives.Well, sorry but this kind of logic didn t make any sense of me so from the start, my head filled with tons of question marks and as you may imagine I couldn t find any proper world building and of course dialogue less story telling style and sharp endings of the chapters, lack of curiosity and mystery are the other factors I couldn t have any connection with the story s progression I also didn t give a damn about the drama of heroine s whirlwind life story.I think writing about powerful motherhood and having your own free will about your body and reproductive system are popular trends for strengthening the feminism manifesto and emphasizing the place the women deserve in the world by putting spotlight of their crucial problems But I found this book s approach to the matter and writing style lack of emotions, dull and flat So I designated myself a lonely place in the minority by being not big fan of this book.Special thanks to NetGalley and Doubleday Books for sharing this ARC with me in exchange my honest review I wish I could enjoy it because I was so excited to read this from the beginning but unfortunately it didn t fulfill my expectations.bloginstagramfacebooktwitter 3 4 starsThis is Calla s story, in an unnamed country, place or time She lives with her father until her first menstruation and then is taken with other girls to The Lottery where she receives a blue ticket which is placed inside a locket She is also painfully fitted with an IUD coil and dispatched to the city to live a childless life of freedom White ticket girls go on to be able to produce children The states will is enforced by Emissaries so there is no way of avoiding your fate She even 3 4 starsThis is Calla s story, in an unnamed country, place or time She lives with her father until her first menstruation and then is taken with other girls to The Lottery where she receives a blue ticket which is placed inside a locket She is also painfully fitted with an IUD coil and dispatched to the city to live a childless life of freedom White ticket girls go on to be able to produce children The states will is enforced by Emissaries so there is no way of avoiding your fate She eventually works in a lab and very much like a lab rat she has to tell her thoughts to Dr A However, Calla has other ideas about her destiny and she s out to make her own choices This leads to punishment and banishment and a dangerous journey to try to get to the border and freedom Along the way she meets a few other women in a similar situation Calla is the storyteller This is a very strange, possibly even weird book and it s very unsettling Calla narrates the story in an unstructured way which I imagine is deliberate as in every other way in this world there is rigid structure However, that makes it hard to read Calla is very difficult to understand and she makes it very hard to empathise She seems robotic, almost dead externally but internally she is something else which is very dark and unfathomable She appears to have no maternal instincts whatsoever so her desire to have a child either comes from some baser instinct over which she has no control or is an act of rebellion She is told she can t have a child so sets about demonstrating that it s her choice to do so She s very disconnected and even with Dr A with whom she has something resembling a relationship she s playing some sort of game to her own rules This is a harsh, clinical book of a dystopian world and it s unrelenting with no soft edges As you read you have so many questions to which there are no answers this is the way it is in this place, there is no perceived rationale Overall, this is probably a Marmite book that some will not like and others who will admire the idea and the way it is written It s very hard to find any empathy because Calla doesn t let you At its heart it s about lack of choice and free will as Calla sets out to prove that it is her body and her decision to do with it what she wills It s a very different book which has to be a positive