The New Gods PDF Ü The New Epub / Paperback

The New Gods PDF Ü The New  Epub / Paperback
    IGNOU books 2019 In Hindi Online PDF Free the relatively pedestrian destination rife with decay, death, and human weakness In another chapter, Cioran explores suicide in shorter, impressionistic bursts, while The Demiurge is a shambolic exploration of man s relationship with good, evil, and God All the while, The New Gods reaffirms Cioran s belief in lucid despair, and his own signature mixture of pessimism and skepticism in language that never fails to be a pleasure Perhaps his prose itself is an argument against Cioran s near nihilism there is beauty in his books."/>
  • Paperback
  • 128 pages
  • The New Gods
  • Emil M. Cioran
  • English
  • 20 June 2017

The New Gods➻ The New Gods Free ➱ Author Emil M. Cioran – Essayreview.co.uk Dubbed Nietzsche without his hammer by literary critic James Wood, the Romanian philosopher E M Cioran is known as much for his profound pessimism and fatalistic approach as for the lyrical, raging pr Dubbed Nietzsche without his hammer by literary critic James Wood, the Romanian philosopher E M Cioran is known as much for his profound pessimism and fatalistic approach as for the lyrical, raging prose with which he communicates them Unlike many of his other works, such as On the Heights of Despair and Tears and Saints, The New Gods eschews his usual aphoristic approach in favor of extensive and analytic essays Returning to many of Cioran s favorite themes, The New Gods explores humanity s attachment to gods, death, fear, and infirmity, in essays that vary widely in The New Epub / form and approach In Paleontology Cioran describes a visit to a museum, finding the relatively pedestrian destination rife with decay, death, and human weakness In another chapter, Cioran explores suicide in shorter, impressionistic bursts, while The Demiurge is a shambolic exploration of man s relationship with good, evil, and God All the while, The New Gods reaffirms Cioran s belief in lucid despair, and his own signature mixture of pessimism and skepticism in language that never fails to be a pleasure Perhaps his prose itself is an argument against Cioran s near nihilism there is beauty in his books.


About the Author: Emil M. Cioran

Born in in R inari, a small village in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania, raised under the rule of a father who was a Romanian Orthodox priest and a mother who was prone to depression, Emil Cioran wrote his first five books in Romanian Some of these are collections of brief essays one or two pages, on average others are collections of aphorisms Suffering from insomnia since his adolescent years in Sibiu, the young Cioran studied philosophy in the little Paris of BucarestA prolific publicist, he became a well known figure, along with Mircea Eliade, Constantin The New Epub / No ca, and his future close friend Eugene Ionesco with whom he shared the Royal Foundation s Young Writers Prize in for his first book, On the Heights of Despair Influenced by the German romantics, by Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Lebensphilosophie of Schelling and Bergson, by certain Russian writers, including Chestov, Rozanov, and Dostoyevsky, and by the Romanian poet Eminescu, Cioran wrote lyrical and expansive meditations that were often metaphysical in nature and whose recurrent themes were death, despair, solitude, history, music, saintliness and the mystics cf Tears and Saints, all of which are themes that one finds again in his French writings In his highly controversial book, The Transfiguration of Romania , Cioran, who was at that time close to the Romanian fascists, violently criticized his country and his compatriots on the basis of a contrast between such little nations as Romania, which were contemptible from the perspective of universal history and great nations, such as France or Germany, which took their destiny into their own hands After spending two years in Germany, Cioran arrived in Paris in He continued to write in Romanian until the early s he wrote his last article in Romanian in , which is also the year in which he began writing in French The break with Romanian became definitive in , when, in the course of translating Mallarm , he suddenly decided to give up his native tongue since no one spoke it in Paris He then began writing in French a book that, thanks to numerous intensive revisions, would eventually become the impressive A Short History of Decay the first of a series of ten books in which Cioran would continue to explore his perennial obsessions, with a growing detachment that allies him equally with the Greek sophists, the French moralists, and the oriental sages He wrote existential vituperations and other destructive reflections in a classical French style that he felt was diametrically opposed to the looseness of his native Romanian he described it as being like a straight jacket that required him to control his temperamental excesses and his lyrical flights The books in which he expressed his radical disillusionment appeared, with decreasing frequency, over a period ofthan three decades, during which time he shared his solitude with his companion Simone Bou in a miniscule garret in the center of Paris, where he lived as a spectatorandturned in on himself and maintaining an ever greater distance from a world that he rejected as much on the historical level History and Utopia, as on the ontological The Fall into Time, , raising his misanthropy to heights of subtlety The Trouble with being Born, , while also allowing to appear from time to time a humanism composed of irony, bitterness, and preciosity Exercices d admiration, , and the posthumously published Notebooks Denied the right to return to Romania during the years of the communist regime, and attracting international attention only late in his career, Cioran died in Paris in Nicolas Cavaill s Translated by Thomas Cousineau.


10 thoughts on “The New Gods

  1. says:

    Lowering Cultural Sea LevelsOne might suspect Cioran of being a modern Gnostic given his persistent references to worldly horrors, both human and natural, his understanding of suicide, and his rather dim view of human fleshiness But he is not For Cioran, Gnosticism is merely another form of wishful fantasy As he takes great pains to point out, Gnosticism is a great way to avoid our responsibilities, which is even a worse flaw than believing we have any It gives us the excuse we need for ou Lowering Cultural Sea LevelsOne might suspect Cioran of being a modern Gnostic given his persistent references to worldly horrors, both human and natural, his understanding of suicide, and his rather dim view of human fleshiness But he is not For Cioran, Gnosticism is merely another form of wishful fantasy As he takes great pains to point out, Gnosticism is a great way to avoid our responsibilities, which is even a worse flaw than believing we have any It gives us the excuse we need for our vices and deficienciesThe Demiurge is the most useful god who ever was If he were not under our hand, where would our bile be poured outGnosticism is one of the first Christian heresies also popular as such in the other monotheisms of Islam and Judaism It asserts that the universe was created by a god like cosmic force, the Demiurge, which separated the souls of human beings from the presence of the official, supreme God and entrapped them in material filth Gnosticism arises periodically in various forms, especially among intellectuals, as an explanation for the patent extent of evil in the world Whether perceived as poetry, philosophy, or ontology, Cioran finds such thoughts offensive.For Cioran, Gnosticism is not some abstract metaphysical theory Or at least that isn t what worries him Gnosticism is an ethic, a code of behaviour, which justifies hatredEach and every form of hate tends as a last resort toward him the Demiurge Since we all believe that our merits are misunderstood or flouted, how admit that so general an iniquity could be the doing of mere manGnosticism is bad because it promotes the doing of bad things to each other as well as to whatever else exists on the planet.Western religion has absorbed a great deal of Gnostic tradition despite its heretical designation Christianity as well as Islam and Judaism , for example, denies that evil exists except as an absence of God, a lack 0f the good What appears as evil is merely a vacuum waiting to be filled by the knowledge of the true God and bybelievers who will spread his fame Hence the command togo forth and multiply and replenish the earth,to fill the world with the consciousness of God and his infinite goodness This isthan the blind leading the blind it is the blind making others blind for their own good.The effect of this command is to deputise each one of us as an official part time demiurge We all are authorised the power of creation, the power, no the duty, to procreate, to replicate ourselves at all costs until we destroy all other forms of life Genetic defectives, sociopaths, abusers, those unable to provide the essentials of life, ill equipped and ill trained adolescents, dynasty builders, we are all enticed to reproduce, not only by nature but also by this cultural imperative According to Cioran,Parents genitors are provocateurs or madThe downward trends in world fertility rates suggests that many people are agreeing with Cioran s diagnosis, not because sex is evil but because having children is mostly selfish and stupid.The Supreme God is now all but gone asthan a symbol of various global faith tribes in all the monotheistic religions So our demiurgic power and authority is effectively unconstrained by any reference to absolute good Heaven and hell are sterile metaphors This is frightening,frightening than the former religious doctrines To combat this fear we have switched our allegiance elsewhereIn the eyes of the ancients, thegods you recognize, the better you serve divinity, whereof they are but the aspects, the facesThe great advantages of polytheism are tolerance and, as in the American Constitution, the separation of powers But we re no longer accustomed to this kind of regime We prefer our gods with single names and singularly impressive strengths So our history has lasting consequencesUnder the regime of several gods, fervor is shared When it is addressed to one god alone it is concentrated, exacerbated, and ends by turning into aggression, into faithWe have learned faith and we intend to practise it with new gods, or rather with one new God that each 0f us constructs Theology has replaced mythology, with disastrous ethical consequences We are forced to choose our god Christian or Muslim, capitalist or socialist, communist or fascist, black, brown or white These are clear choices supplied ready cut and packaged, with prices attached As Cioran quips laconically,We do not beseech a nuanceAs the conservatives like to remind us all We need boundariesThere is an underlying polytheism in liberal democracy call it an unconscious polytheism conversely, every authoritarian regime partakes of a disguised monotheismAs long as no one takes their religion asthan a mark of solidarity, no one notices the presumption This is why evangelical Christianity, Islam, or even Judaism as faiths are so dangerous in a democratic society Their truths are non negotiable their people are united in resistance to those not their people Soas soon as a divinity, or a doctrine, claims supremacy, freedom is threatenedNineteenth century Protestants were correct the Catholic Church did indeed desire the subversion of American freedom But so did those Protestants and they still do.There are no longer any false gods, merely diverse and contradictory interpretations of the same God This subtilely but decisively is destroying politics around the world What remains is a sort of hostile nihilism expressed perfectly by Trump and Putin and Modi and their cronies Cioran got it exactly correctWe denounce the coexistence of truths because we are no longer satisfied with the dearth each one affordsToday, it is the Christians who have slid into Gnosticism They feel they are surrounded by evil and untruth and must escape at all costs The planet and its people are collateral damage.The alliance between dictatorial rulers and strong faith is not accidental Since the ascendancy of Christianity in the Western Roman Empire and Islam in the Eastern, it has always been so Quite apart from its political impact, this alliance has also been disastrous aestheticallyNothingodious than the tone of those who are defending a cause, one compromised in appearance, winning in fact who cannot contain their delight at the idea of their triumph nor help turning their very terrors into so many threatsHatred is an aesthetic, one which monotheism promotes consistently It is through this aesthetic not political debate that racism, misogyny, and violence proliferate Cioran doesn t so much deconstruct individual ideas as point out the questionable foundational presumptions of the entire edifice of European thought A large part of this foundation is religious and although generally forgotten and ignored, it lies there mouldering and rotting until it can no longer support the weight we culturally load onto it Like the wooden piles that support the canal houses in Amsterdam, the foundation crumbles when exposed to the air In this sense Cioran moves counter to perhaps the most visible symbol of our present he lowers cultural sea levels

  2. says:

    A man does not kill himself, as is commonly supposed, in a fit of madness but rather in a fit of unendurable lucidity, in a paroxysm which may, if so desired, be identified with madness for an excessive perspicacity, carried to the limit and of which one longs to be rid at all costs, exceeds the context of reason.The obsession with suicide is characteristic of the man who can neither live nor die, and whose attention never swerves from this double impossibility.The flesh spreads, further and A man does not kill himself, as is commonly supposed, in a fit of madness but rather in a fit of unendurable lucidity, in a paroxysm which may, if so desired, be identified with madness for an excessive perspicacity, carried to the limit and of which one longs to be rid at all costs, exceeds the context of reason.The obsession with suicide is characteristic of the man who can neither live nor die, and whose attention never swerves from this double impossibility.The flesh spreads, further and further, like a gangrene upon the surface of the globe It cannot impose limits upon itself, it continues to be rife despite its rebuffs, it takes its defeats for conquests, it has never learned anything It belongs above all to the realm of the Creator, and it is indeed in the flesh that He has projected His maleficent instincts.Always to have lived with the nostalgia to coincide with something, but not really knowing with what it is easy to shift from unbelief to belief, or conversely But what is there to convert to, and what is there to abjure, in a state of chronic lucidity In order to conceive, and to steep ourselves in, unreality, we must have it constantly present to our minds The day we feel it, see it, everything becomes unreal, except that unreality which alone makes existence tolerable.Madness is perhaps merely an affliction which no longer develops. Good day sunshine

  3. says:

    Cioran c mlelerle ate ediyor

  4. says:

    Blaivinantis pesimizmas.

  5. says:

    EM Corian, the Romanian Philosopher, is perhaps the most pessimistic writer who lures the reader with his iconoclastic thoughts about everything life, Gods, religion, society and culture His writings is like that of someone possessed subversive, demoniacal, anti inspirational, feverish and finally enchanting This book is replete with so many lyrical aphorisms that one stays excited and wonder whether is it is a rare combo of art and philosophy Yet, many of his aphorisms, like that of epitap EM Corian, the Romanian Philosopher, is perhaps the most pessimistic writer who lures the reader with his iconoclastic thoughts about everything life, Gods, religion, society and culture His writings is like that of someone possessed subversive, demoniacal, anti inspirational, feverish and finally enchanting This book is replete with so many lyrical aphorisms that one stays excited and wonder whether is it is a rare combo of art and philosophy Yet, many of his aphorisms, like that of epitaphs, aim for timelessness He is like a mad man who seeks objectivity, such is Cioran s self contradictory assessment and one can sense his delirious fervor in all his books How can one resist laughing and at the same time admiring on a famous quote like, Reality gives me asthma.In his lifetime, Cioran , who later chose to write his works in French, was acclaimed by St John Perse as the greatest French writer to honor our language since the death of Paul Val ry , a master of French prose and a modern Socrates, and the most distinguished figure in the tradition of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Wittgenstein Susan Sontag When he died in Paris in 1995, he was honored with a standing ovation in the Assembl e Nationale that described him as one of the greatest French philosophers of the 20th century.The book The New Gods , beautifully translated by Richard Howard, explores humanity s attachment to gods, death, fear, and infirmity, in essays that vary widely in form and approach The very first line in the chapter Demiurge itself reflects Cioran s deepening pessimism about man s capacity to do anything good With the exception of some aberrant cases, man does not incline to the good what god would impel him to do so Man must vanquish himself, must do himself violence, in order to perform the slightest action untainted by evil He then makes a challenging statement that our Lord had no hand in creation It is difficult, it is impossible to believe that the Good Lord Our Father had a hand in the scandal of creation Everything suggests that He took no part in it, that it proceeds from a god without scruples, a feculent god Goodness does not create, lacking imagination it takes imagination to put together a world, however botched At the very least, there must be a mixture of good and evil in order to produce an action or a work Creation is in fact a fault, man s famous sin thereby appearing as a minor version of a much graver one What are we guilty of, except of having followed,or less slavishly, the Creator s example Easy to recognize in ourselves the fatality which was His not for nothing have we issued from the hands of a wicked and woebegone god, a god accursed In the next chapter New Gods , he says that Man can breathe only in the shadow of eroded divinities In his opinion, The beginnings of a religion like the beginnings of anything are always suspect They alone, though, possess some reality, they alone are true true and abominable Cioran lashes trenchantly against Christianity s early coercion for conversion But what sort of frenzy was it in which the citizen participated when he became a convert Not so well prepared as the others, he possessed but one recourse to hate himself Without this deviation of hatred, at first atypical, subsequently contagious, Christianity would have remained nothan a sect, limited to a foreign clientele, actually capable of nothan painlessly trading in the old gods for a nailed corpse Cioran, though a Christian, istolerant to Judaism and quotes the Roman Emperor Julian Judaism regarded them all as false except one, its own Their only error, Julian says of the Jews, is that even as they seek to satisfy their god, they do not serve the others at the same time Yet he praises them for their repugnance to follow the fashion with regard to religion I shun innovation in all things, and especially in that which concerns the gods an admission which has discredited him and which is used to brand him as a reactionary But what progress, one wonders, does Christianity represent in relation to paganism There is no qualitative leap from one god to another, nor from one civilization to another, anythan from one language to another In Paleontology Cioran describes a visit to a Natural History museum I think it must be the one in London as he speaks of Minerals section as well , finding the relatively pedestrian destination rife with decay, death, and human weakness The unwanted attention given to skeletons makes him nervous He writes Nowhere is one better served with respect to the past Here the possible seems inconceivable or cracked One gets the impression that the flesh was eclipsed upon its advent, that in fact it never existed at all, that it could not have been fastened to bones so stately, so imbued with themselves The flesh appears as an imposture, a fraud, a disguise which masks nothing Was this all it was And if it is worth no , how does it manage to inspire me with repulsion or with terror The chapter on Encounters with Suicides is fascinating for its surreal meditation Cioran occupies a position of extreme solitude in French intellectual life Like his fellow Romanian, the playwright Eugene Ionesco, who also lives in Paris, he is fascinated by death, although Mr Ionesco flees it in a panic while Mr.Cioran woos it with honeyed words and knowing smiles Cioran explores suicide in impressionistic bursts and think of suicide as the abyss without vertigo He finds in suicide the intoxication of feeling pulverized by your own consciousness and yet, without the notion of suicide one would kill oneself on the spot We are jolted when he says Whoever hasn t died young deserves death He is seduced by the possibility of conceiving a thought just one, but one that would tear the universe to pieces But it is the empty mind, the psyche detached from all idols, that liberates a triumphal stupor Health consists in exercise and vacuity, in muscles and meditation in no case in thought But we must beware void s mimic, Nothingness Like Nietzsche, Cioran writes ironically, poetically, of death and drive Terrifying happiness Veins in which thousands of planets distend He is not without humor Fear of an imminent collapse of the brain counts for a great deal in the need to pray The last section, Strangled Thoughts is one where Cioran is at his best in the form of the aphorism I wish to quote liberally from this section as well as some of the preceding ones to give an impression about the treasure trove of ideas the book contains At this very moment, almost everywhere, thousands and thousands are dying, while, clutching my pen, I vainly search for a word to annotate their agony.Each moment s tug of war between nostalgia for the deluge and intoxication with routine.What is called strength of mind is the courage not to imagine our fate otherwise.First duty, on getting up in the morning to blush for yourself.Refinement is the sign of deficient vitality, in art, in love, and in everything.Endless brooding over a question undermines you as much as a dull pain.Each being is a broken hymn The only man who knows what it feels like to be accursed is the man who knows he would have that feeling in the middle of paradise Everything, in the end, comes down to desire or to the absence of desire The rest is nuance.Sickness gives flavor to want, it intensifies, it picks up poverty.There is only one sign that indicates we have understood everything tears without cause What they ask you for is actions, proofs, works, and all you can produce are transformed tears.What is commonly called being expressive is being prolix.On the spiritual level, all pain is an opportunity on the spiritual level alone.The only true solitude is where we brood upon the urgency of a prayer a prayer posterior to God and to faith itself.Frivolous, disconnected, an amateur at everything, I shall have known thoroughly only the disadvantage of having been born.We would not be interested in human beings if we did not have the hope of someday meeting someone worse off than ourselves.Suicide is a sudden accomplishment, a lightning like deliverance it is nirvana by violence.So simple a fact as looking at a knife and realizing that it depends only on yourself to make a certain use of it gives you a sensation of sovereignty which can turn to megalomania.Sleep would be good for something if each time we dropped off we tried to see ourselves die after a few years training, death would lose all its prestige and would seem nothan a formality or a pinprick.To look for a meaning in anything is less the act of a naif than of a masochist.Eat nothing you have not sown and harvested with your own hand this recommendation of Vedic wisdom is so legitimate and so convincing that, in one s rage over being unable to abide by it, one would like to let oneself starve to death.So long as you envy another s success, even if it is a god s, you are a vile slave like everyone else.We may be sure that the twenty first century,advanced than ours, will regard Hitler and Stalin as choirboys.Death is the aroma of existence Death alone lends savor to the moments, alone combats their insipidity We owe death almost everything This debt of recognition which we now and then consent to pay is what is most comforting here on earth.Wisdom disguises our wounds it teaches us how to bleed in secret.Everything blurs and fades in human beings except the look in their eyes and the voice without these, we could recognize no one after a few years.Nothing gives us a better conscience than to fall asleep with the clear view of one of our defects, which till then we hadn t dared admit, we hadn t even suspected.Speech and silence We feel safer with a madman who talks than with one who cannot open his mouth.Awakening is independent of intellectual capacities a genius can be a dunce, spiritually speaking Moreover, knowledge as such gets one no further An illiterate can possess the eye of understanding and thereby find himself above and beyond any scholar.I love Cioran s howling pessimism and he teaches us to doubt than devour everything that we come across in life He is a rare distillation of all the philosophers Pascal, Montaigne, La Rochefoucauld and Schopenhauer who preceded him The New Gods reaffirms Cioran s belief in lucid despair, and his own signature mixture of pessimism and scepticism in language that never fails to be a pleasure Let me conclude with his lovely message For a man to whom freedom and vertigo are equivalent, a faith, wherever it comes from, even if it were antireligious, is a salutary shackle, a desired, a dreamed of chain whose function will be to constrain curiosity and fever, to suspend the anguish of the indefinite I must frame this somewhere

  6. says:

    In light of current events I lost the excitement that this book had for me This line towards the end of the book sort of neatly sums up my current feelings on the book In theory, it matters little to me whether I live as whether I die in practice, I am lacerated by every anxiety which opens an abyss between life and death.

  7. says:

    A c uta un sens vreunui lucru ine nu at t de naivitate, c t de masochism.Am n comun cu Diavolul posomorala, sunt ca i el un melancolic prin decret divin.Anxiosul i construie te spaimele, apoi se cuib re te n ele un pensionar al vertijului.

  8. says:

    At present, to think of this book is to give myself a screaming headache I certainly hope to provide acoherent review someday, but that day is not today and is not likely any time in the immediate future It is not quite like any book I ve ever read before, I can confidently state that But whether the author is simply a raving maniac or a deeply profound thinker I can t confidently agree with either assertion Nor can I disagree with either And, curiously, I can t help but think Cioran At present, to think of this book is to give myself a screaming headache I certainly hope to provide acoherent review someday, but that day is not today and is not likely any time in the immediate future It is not quite like any book I ve ever read before, I can confidently state that But whether the author is simply a raving maniac or a deeply profound thinker I can t confidently agree with either assertion Nor can I disagree with either And, curiously, I can t help but think Cioran would disagree with either or both labels So This book is seriously fucked up In the same way a Molotov Cocktail dropped on your head would be Yet it manages to grab your attention and hold itin the same way a Molotov Cocktail dropped on your head would Which doubtless makes absolutely no sense Unless you read the book At which point I would submit my little conceit would make sense, at least arguably Cheers

  9. says:

    It is during our insomnias that pain fulfills its mission, that it materializes, blossoms Then pain is as limitless as the night, which it imitates After certain nights, we should change names, since we are also no longer the same man Alone, even doing nothing, you do not waste your time You do, almost always, in company No encounter with yourself can be altogether sterile Something necessarily emerges, even if only the hope of some day meeting yourself again There are nights when the It is during our insomnias that pain fulfills its mission, that it materializes, blossoms Then pain is as limitless as the night, which it imitates After certain nights, we should change names, since we are also no longer the same man Alone, even doing nothing, you do not waste your time You do, almost always, in company No encounter with yourself can be altogether sterile Something necessarily emerges, even if only the hope of some day meeting yourself again There are nights when the future cancels out, when onlyone of all its moments subsists, the one we shall choose inorder to exist no longer

  10. says:

    This book presents a philosophy resembling nihilism, with the added thought that one the non self should embrace the void nothingness.The first third of the book is absolutely superb, not that a typical person would agree with much of it, but that it gets you to think about things in a different way It is not likely to dissuade anyone from their views, in my estimation, but it is good at getting one to explore different modes of thinking The middle third attempts to sell the reader on su This book presents a philosophy resembling nihilism, with the added thought that one the non self should embrace the void nothingness.The first third of the book is absolutely superb, not that a typical person would agree with much of it, but that it gets you to think about things in a different way It is not likely to dissuade anyone from their views, in my estimation, but it is good at getting one to explore different modes of thinking The middle third attempts to sell the reader on suicide Anyone who is depressed should probably skim over this section, or just skip the book completely It is actually pretty well argued, although, as you can see, I did not embrace it.The last third of the book is what kept this from being a four star book The last third is just utter trash The author attempts to write in a Proverbs style, and ends up saying some of the stupidest imaginable things, with the stupid far outweighing the relatively few worthwhile insights It is hard to believe that the author of the first two thirds of the book also wrote the last third.I had one of the author s books on back order, but cancelled the order after I finished reading this book If you find this in the library sometime when you are browsing around, you might want to scan the first third Otherwise, I think your money and time could be better spent

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