Lazarillo de Tormes and The Swindler: Two Spanish

Lazarillo de Tormes and The Swindler: Two Spanish
  • Paperback
  • 240 pages
  • Lazarillo de Tormes and The Swindler: Two Spanish Picaresque Novels
  • Francisco de Quevedo
  • English
  • 19 May 2017
  • 0140449000

Lazarillo de Tormes and The Swindler: Two Spanish Picaresque Novels✪ [PDF] ✐ Lazarillo de Tormes and The Swindler: Two Spanish Picaresque Novels By Francisco de Quevedo ✷ – Essayreview.co.uk The unlikely heroes of the Spanish picaresque novels make their way by whatever means they can through a colourful and seamy underworld populated by unsavoury beggars, corrupt priests, eccentrics, who The unlikely heroes Tormes and ePUB ´ of the Spanish picaresque novels make their way by whatever means they can through a colourful and seamy underworld populated by unsavoury beggars, corrupt priests, eccentrics, whores and criminals Both Lazarillo de Tormesand Pablos and the swindler are determined to attain the trappings of the gentleman, but have little time for the gentlemanly ideals of religion, justice, honour and nobilityFor than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English speaking world With than , titles, Lazarillo de PDF/EPUB or Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up to date translations by award winning translators.


About the Author: Francisco de Quevedo

Francisco G mez Tormes and ePUB ´ de Quevedo y Santib ez Villegas was a nobleman, politician and writer of the Spanish Golden Age His style is categorized by what was called conceptismo, characterized by a rapid rhythm, directness, simple vocabulary, witty metaphors, and wordplay.


10 thoughts on “Lazarillo de Tormes and The Swindler: Two Spanish Picaresque Novels

  1. says:

    The first picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormesof a novella really is an excellent introduction to the genre and a very good book on its own merits It is funny I laughed out loudthan a few times, and I don t do that for anybody but Wodehouse The atmosphere is realistic and gritty, filled with memorable character portraits the down at heels gentleman who would rather starve than reveal his shameful poverty is a particularly notable and characteristically Spanish example , a The first picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormesof a novella really is an excellent introduction to the genre and a very good book on its own merits It is funny I laughed out loudthan a few times, and I don t do that for anybody but Wodehouse The atmosphere is realistic and gritty, filled with memorable character portraits the down at heels gentleman who would rather starve than reveal his shameful poverty is a particularly notable and characteristically Spanish example , and the overall tone of the novel is delightfully ironic Lazarillo begins life as a desperately poor urchin who survives through his intelligent estimation and manipulation of others, but, by the end of the book, when he has attained a modicum of comfort and stability, he allows even this small bit of status to fill him with illusions, convincing him that his dubious office of town crier is actually respectable, and leading him to believe that his wife is faithful, even though she is obviously the mistress of the the local priest In spite of this, though, we don t despise him, because through all he is resourceful and compassionate and filled with great good humor This exemplary work is coupled here with another well regarded piece of early picaresque fiction, El Buscon or The Swindler. I don t have any right to evaluate it definitively, for two reasons 1 I read it in an English translation, and it is particularly valued for its highly ornate baroque Spanish style, of which I know nothing I couldn t help comparing it to Thomas Nashe s The Unfortunate Traveler, an early English picaresque that I highly esteem and yet am sure would lose three quarters of its power in translation , and 2 I hated it so much that I only finished half of it Even if I could appreciate the style, I believe I should still detest the author He is an Islamophobe and an anti Semite, but what he hates eventhan Moors and Jews are conversos, Moors and Jews who have converted to Christianity, presumably going along to get along He is a well bred snob who despises upstarts and social climbers, but who reserves some his most vicious ridicule for down at heels gentleman who try to conceal their poverty A kind of person whom the author of Lazarillo de Tormes treats with dignity and respect Even worse, however, is that the author does not seem to respect his own hero It is as if Mark Twain despised Huck Finn, his origins and allegiances, and valued him only as a narrative conceit that would allow his creator in artfully patterned baroque phrases to pillory the King and the Duke, humiliate the Grangerfords, and joyously annihilate the humanity of Jim by mocking his aspirations for freedom

  2. says:

    Some entertaining moments Some fun swindles I would say you could read it for an understanding of the times in which Lope de Vega and Cervantes lived Those were different times, when a book like this could make a splash Nowadays, it gets relegated to the dusty shelf of classics alongside Humphrey Clinker and what not True, it is not a magnificent piece of fiction It does not astound with its intelligence, but it contains wit and merry adventure in the filthy streets and abbeys of Spain, wh Some entertaining moments Some fun swindles I would say you could read it for an understanding of the times in which Lope de Vega and Cervantes lived Those were different times, when a book like this could make a splash Nowadays, it gets relegated to the dusty shelf of classics alongside Humphrey Clinker and what not True, it is not a magnificent piece of fiction It does not astound with its intelligence, but it contains wit and merry adventure in the filthy streets and abbeys of Spain, which is enough atmosphere and reward for me.As an artifact, and an argument for the picaresque genre, I would argue its importance As a precursor to Don Quixote, as some claim, I would scoff at that The Introduction and notes doto spoil the fun than enlighten the reader I don t go into reading fiction to uncover multi lingual puns, but slap a few clever translations into a foreign book and readers seem to revel and exude exuberance Puns are nice and all but the meat and potatoes of the story and characters doto fill me up

  3. says:

    I enjoyed these two novels Seedy characters and crime, some funny moments This is v episodic, and because of that it s hard to remember what happens in what order, but that s not really the point of novels like this Lots of repetitive violence, so much so that there were moments where I was like, Give the guy a break But overall I think I m into the picaresque.

  4. says:

    Lazarillo de Tormes, published in 1554, is a book about today.It s about political, religious and economic elites swindling the gullible masses about starving people being told by gluttons that they re lucky to be in a land of plenty and opportunity It s about corruption cloaked in respectability at all socio economic levels It s about hypocrisy and lies and one boy s school of hard knocks education in spotting them and adapting them to his own survival needs.It s also very funny, shrewd, baw Lazarillo de Tormes, published in 1554, is a book about today.It s about political, religious and economic elites swindling the gullible masses about starving people being told by gluttons that they re lucky to be in a land of plenty and opportunity It s about corruption cloaked in respectability at all socio economic levels It s about hypocrisy and lies and one boy s school of hard knocks education in spotting them and adapting them to his own survival needs.It s also very funny, shrewd, bawdy and fast moving The prose is direct, unaffected, and not flowery.Those who think the Spanish classic Don Quixote is the first novel in Western literature might be surprised to learn that Lazarillo predates it by 50 years Who actually wrote it is unclear, though many scholars attribute it to one Diego Hurtado de Mendoza It is considered the first picaresque novel, a genre marked by corrupt characters getting by on their wits, traveling in search of wealth and respectability though not necessarily informed by true moral scruples.On the surface, Lazarillo is a breezy road adventure tale of a boy, Lazaro, traveling from place to place in old Spain, enduring starvation and random violence, trying to find shelter and security and a modicum of comfort, while taking in all the contradictions of the adult world with a charming sense of naivete, freshly minted street smarts and a wry, cockeyed optimism At the same time, the book is an astute social satire.Left to his devices by a poor mother and a delinquent father, Lazaro finds himself taken in in both senses of the word by a succession of mostly poor masters, from an old, abusive blind con man to a stingy priest to a prideful impoverished bourgeoisie landowner The ways Lazaro devises to trick his succession of masters as well as their own attempts to dupe him make up the bulk of the comedy of the book, but also serve as the template for the book s ample and deft social criticism.Religion the Catholic Church especially comes in for a drubbing in the book, as several of Lazaro s masters blatantly peddle religious piety to swindle the hoi polloi.The story is told in the first person within a retrospective framework that at first seems epistolary Lazaro is making a written account of his life to someone he addresses as your Honor or your Grace It isn t clear who this correspondent really is, or whether it s being solicited by a judge, a biographer, or God himself Nor is it known why the account is being solicited It would appear that Lazaro has achieved some measure of wealth, fame or notoriety We don t know whether they have come to bury Lazaro or to praise him.This proto Horatio Alger tale, in which Lazaro rises by dint of hard work, ends fairly abruptly, with Lazaro having achieved some measure of comfort and an acceptance of the social order and all its flaws, and a resigned willingness to accept things he cannot change.A movie adaptation of Lazarillo starring a charming boy actor, was made in Spain in 1959, and it is quite good It s unjustly forgotten, considering it won the Berlin Film Festival s Golden Bear that year I saw it in college projected from 16 millimeter and I m pretty sure I was the only person in the room who was excited to see it I m quite pleased to now have finally read the wispy little novel on which it was based Highly recommended if you re looking for a short and unjustly lesser known classic to notch in less than a day.P.S To date, I have not read the second work in this duo pack, The Swindler by a different author kr ky, trimmed and amended 2016

  5. says:

    A pair of picaresque novels The first is the very first known example of the picaresque genre, Lazarillo de Tormes published in 1554, and the second is one of the most accomplished examples of the genre, The Swindler by the extraordinarily colourful Francisco de Quevedo, published in 1604 Lazarillo de Tormes was possibly authored by Diego Hurtado de Mendoza but no one can say for certain It s a crude work and moves fast V.S Naipaul read it at a young age and wanted to translate it for Peng A pair of picaresque novels The first is the very first known example of the picaresque genre, Lazarillo de Tormes published in 1554, and the second is one of the most accomplished examples of the genre, The Swindler by the extraordinarily colourful Francisco de Quevedo, published in 1604 Lazarillo de Tormes was possibly authored by Diego Hurtado de Mendoza but no one can say for certain It s a crude work and moves fast V.S Naipaul read it at a young age and wanted to translate it for Penguin Classics but he was told that interest in such a work among modern English readers would be too slight a few years later they commissioned a translation from a scholar Naipaul felt that the voice of this novel was one that would be applicable to the rumbustious comedies he wanted to write about life in Trinidad This shows that the vital influence of certain works can span many centuries.Personally I regard Lazarillo de Tormes as worth reading mainly as a good introduction to the picaresque genre as a whole It sets up the world of 16th Century Spain very well But Quevedo s The Swindler exploits the setting in a farmasterful manner The adventures of his protagonist Pablos are fast, brutal, scatalogical, scurrilous and satirical Many regard this as the best picaresque novel ever written my own choice for that honour would be Alain Ren Lesage s Gil Blas But certainly I have to agree that, at the very least, Quevedo s prose style filled with ingenious and hilarious wordplay is extremely entertaining

  6. says:

    This book, which contains two novels, is a great example of what life was like for the poor in Spain during the sixteen century At times, the stories are dramatic and emotionally intense, and at other times they can be funny in a depressing sort of manner Overall, the stories are excellent though and were interesting enough to have continued attention throughout both novels I would recommend this for anyone wanting to learnabout what life was like for those at the bottom of the barrel d This book, which contains two novels, is a great example of what life was like for the poor in Spain during the sixteen century At times, the stories are dramatic and emotionally intense, and at other times they can be funny in a depressing sort of manner Overall, the stories are excellent though and were interesting enough to have continued attention throughout both novels I would recommend this for anyone wanting to learnabout what life was like for those at the bottom of the barrel during this time period

  7. says:

    Hilarious For fans of tales of down and outs and their hijinx Reminded me of Sam Selvon s Lonely Londoners, all the characters we meet are so memorable even in how similar they are between the two stories I was also very happy to see the banishment of the poets in The Swindler, a clever platonic reference that would be cheap if it wasn t for its astute irony.

  8. says:

    Lazarillo de TormesI actually had read this book before I was a Spanish major in college and I had to do a report on this book for my Spanish literature class Of course that time it was in Spanish I greatly enjoyed reading it in English It was actually better than I remember I m not saying its fantastic and I ll read it all the time, but an occasional read may once a year of so it would be good for.It is a surprisingly short read, only seven chapters long about 60 pages The story follows Lazarillo de TormesI actually had read this book before I was a Spanish major in college and I had to do a report on this book for my Spanish literature class Of course that time it was in Spanish I greatly enjoyed reading it in English It was actually better than I remember I m not saying its fantastic and I ll read it all the time, but an occasional read may once a year of so it would be good for.It is a surprisingly short read, only seven chapters long about 60 pages The story follows a boy named Lazaro de Tormes Lazarillo is his nickname as he writes a letter to Your Honour about his life before ending up being the town crier for the church in Toledo, Spain Each chapter covers a different master he served The first is a rather evil blind beggar he is employed by to help move from city to city and to run errands The second is a stingy priest who almost starves him to death The third is a rather nice country squire who actually turns out to bepoor than Lazarillo himself Lazarillo actually goes back to begging for the both of them to earn food and money Next is another priest, not quite as bad as his previous matters, but does too much traveling for Lazarillo The fifth master was another clergyman, this one a trickster who sold Papal Indulgences that would guarantee a place in heaven Lazarillo leaves him as well He ends up in Toledo working for a priest by leading a water mule around town and selling water.Through each episode of his servitude, you hear the tricks and scams the masters played in order to get money The majority of the time, Lazarillo is either denied food or given very little so his master can save money You learn his struggle with hunger and poverty and feel for his pain You seem him try to stay true to his faith and not become an evil person like his masters He ends up as he wanted a respectable citizen with some money and a home.The book is written very simply It is a very quick, easy read with simple vocabulary and sentence structures There is not a whole lot of cultural information imparted, but you get a little bit of knowledge about the different classes and what is expected The country squire Lazarillo serves actually shares the most about expectations and the reality of gentlemen during the time There is also a lot of scheming in the church by the priests.I wouldn t recommend this to just anyone It is definitely a book you would go looking for instead of just picking it up and reading it It would be quite boring to a lot of people I like it for its simplicity and its contribution to Spanish literature If you are looking for an educational read, a small biography of hard times, this is the book for you.https bookmouseblog.wordpress.com 2The SwindlerThis book took the picaresque writing style to heart and is a great example of the style The goal of picaresque is a story is where the main character gets by on his or her wits, primarily through cons, theft, and deceit Those elements are layered all throughout this book The main character gets drawn in to the world through necessity, but develops an affinity for the lies, tricks, and cons His pursuit of a lifestyle draws him deeper into the world as his cons work, fail, work, and fail You do get to see that a life of crime is no party.The book follows Pablos from a young age It is broken into two parts The first part follows him as he is sent to school by his parents He becomes a servant for a wealthy friend and follows him through different schools, facing hunger and poverty regularly He gets a letter from his uncle about his parents being arrested and he returns home to collect his inheritance and decide to go to Madrid in order to distance himself from his relations On his way, he meets a con man who introduces him to a life of thievery and cons.Start book two The con man welcomes him into his band of cheats They all instruct him on different ways to con, lie, and deceive He learns to rig dice and card games, beg and not be recognized, have dinner with others and never have to pay, and collect items to re sell for profit After the band is arrested, Pablos bribes a guard and gets out He remakes himself as a gentleman He woos a wealthy woman but is eventually found out He is forced to flee Madrid He eventually marries and the move to the New World to start anew.It is rather fascinating how he manages to get through life You get to read about his different cons and those going on around him You learn a lot about the thief world of the middle ages and how a person got drawn into it You don t particularly get to know Pablos very well, but you empathize with him somewhat There are points you cheer for him to succeed and other times you get annoyed with the cons he runs How he gets into trouble, gets out of it, or manages to flee is interesting to read However, the book is rather dry There is not a lot of action or drama It is rather like reading a biography Readers of today I think would find it somewhat boring The content is somewhat interesting, but you really need to want to read it in order to finish it.https bookmouseblog.wordpress.com 2

  9. says:

    picaresque is always fun there s a sodomite in the second and a very good guide to how to cheat at writing

  10. says:

    The picaresque novel came into fashion at a time when Spain was experiencing a moral decline The nobility without scruples plagued the streets as much as thieves and swindlers These two novels portray the criminal world while touching the subjects of religious hypocricy, the distortion of honor away from relating to an individual s actions, the importance of appearances over honest work, and hatred towards the religious other and converts Lazarillo de Tormes is one of the most famous Spanis The picaresque novel came into fashion at a time when Spain was experiencing a moral decline The nobility without scruples plagued the streets as much as thieves and swindlers These two novels portray the criminal world while touching the subjects of religious hypocricy, the distortion of honor away from relating to an individual s actions, the importance of appearances over honest work, and hatred towards the religious other and converts Lazarillo de Tormes is one of the most famous Spanish picaresque novels Lazarillo gives Your Honor an account of the misfortunes of his life beginning with his childhood as the son of a poor couple As he begins working for a blind man a swindling blind man , he learns that in order to survive on the streets, he needs to learn how to outsmart others and take advantage of them There are many funny moments and lots of scatological humor accompanied by abuses ofpower, religious hypocricy, and all sorts of injustices directed towards Lazarillo as well as others around him This is the story of an anti hero you feel sorry for at times, but not always It is a short, entertaining read and one of my favorites The Swindler Don Pablos is a son of a dishonest barber and a woman reputed to be a witch and of Jewish descent despite her catholic implying last names Don Pablos recountsthe experiences of his life he first lets the reader or the listener, if they are blind know that his dream as a child was to become a gentleman Unfortunately, he is drawn into a world of swindlers and thieves and does not seem to have the will power to pull himself out Like Lazarillo, Don Pablos finds himself going from desperate to desperate situation There is a lot of humor in the novel pertaining to the incidents of decet and digestive health There are a lot of hillarious similes, the language is simple and it is much like Lazarillo de Tormes in form, but with a character who handles himself very differently and learns very different life lessons

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