The Door in the Wall PDF/EPUB Ò The Door Kindle - in

The Door in the Wall PDF/EPUB Ò The Door  Kindle - in
  • Paperback
  • 120 pages
  • The Door in the Wall
  • Marguerite de Angeli
  • English
  • 06 May 2017
  • 0440227798

The Door in the Wall❰Read❯ ➵ The Door in the Wall Author Marguerite de Angeli – Essayreview.co.uk The bells clang above plague ridden London as Robin lies helpless, cold, and hungry The great house is empty, his father is fighting the Scots in the north, his mother is traveling with the Queen, and The bells clang above plague ridden in the PDF Ë London as Robin lies helpless, cold, and hungry The great house is empty, his father is fighting the Scots in the north, his mother is traveling with the Queen, and the servants have fled He calls for help but only the stones hear his cries Suddenly someone else is in the house, coming towards Robin It is Brother Luke, a The Door Kindle - wandering friar, who takes Robin to St Mark s Monastery, where he will be cared for until his father sends for himAt last, a message comes Robin is to meet his father at Castle Lindsay The journey is dangerous, and the castle is located near the hostile Welsh border Perched high in the hills, the castle appears invincible But it is not Under the cover of a Door in the Kindle Ð thick fog the Welsh attack the castle And Robin is the only one who can save it.


About the Author: Marguerite de Angeli

Marguerite de Angeli was an American in the PDF Ë writer and illustrator of children s books including the Newbery Award winning book The Door in the Wall She wrote and illustrated twenty eight of her own books, and illustratedthan three dozen books and numerous magazine stories and articles for other authors.


10 thoughts on “The Door in the Wall

  1. says:

    Straightforward children s fiction about Medieval life, resilience, and finding ways to cope with loss and overcoming fears The motto of the book is in the title if you walk along a wall long enough, you will find a door to a new life.The young main character must learn to find new doors to open when he has to face the bitter fact that he is unable to use his legs His future as a knight is in jeopardy A kind monk helps him to understand that using his mind and learning to read will carry h Straightforward children s fiction about Medieval life, resilience, and finding ways to cope with loss and overcoming fears The motto of the book is in the title if you walk along a wall long enough, you will find a door to a new life.The young main character must learn to find new doors to open when he has to face the bitter fact that he is unable to use his legs His future as a knight is in jeopardy A kind monk helps him to understand that using his mind and learning to read will carry him even further than his legs ever could.What I learned from reading this with my children Compassion, determination, education and flexibility are great values, and to build a better future for ourselves, we must always remember to put enough doors into our walls to give children with disadvantages a fair chance to find them

  2. says:

    A lovely story, simply yet eloquently written with a beautiful message.We all have walls in our lives but the Lord always provides a door.

  3. says:

    I love a story with a wealth of meaning behind its words This one is exemplary Within, young Robyn s father has left for the Scottish wars, his mother has gone to wait on the ailing queen, and Robyn awaits John the Fletcher who will escort him to the manor of Sir Peter where Robyn will serve as squire But Robyn takes ill and loses the use of his legs, John the Fletcher never arrives, and the servants flee for fear of the plague that rages through London A monk named Brother Luke carries Roby I love a story with a wealth of meaning behind its words This one is exemplary Within, young Robyn s father has left for the Scottish wars, his mother has gone to wait on the ailing queen, and Robyn awaits John the Fletcher who will escort him to the manor of Sir Peter where Robyn will serve as squire But Robyn takes ill and loses the use of his legs, John the Fletcher never arrives, and the servants flee for fear of the plague that rages through London A monk named Brother Luke carries Robyn to the abbey where he cares for him Thou hast only to follow the wall far enough and there will be a door in it, the monk encourages him But who would look for such a thing in illness At the abbey, Robyn recovers, but his legs remain crippled We must teach thy hands to be skillful in many ways, and we must teach thy mind to go about whether thy legs will carry thee or no, Brother Luke tells Robyn For reading is another door in the wall, dost understand, my son Robyn grows strong, and eventually receives word from his father to continue to Sir Peter s, which he does with the aid of the monk It is there, when danger threatens the castle, that Robyn truly comes to understand Brother Luke s words For it is there he finds his own door in the wall Written in 1949 and capturing the Newbery the following year, The Door in the Wall has become an American classic Its sweet story and positive message are still as relevant today as they were sixty years ago It is chuck full of gentle lessons, like Each of us has his place in the world If we cannot serve in one way, there is always another Or, None of us is perfect It is better to have crooked legs than a crooked spirit We can only do the best we can with what we have And, He had found out that the harder it was to do something, thecomfortable he felt after he had done it The Door in the Wall also provides a textbook of fascinating medieval context Ms deAngeli had a special talent for detail that adds such richness to her settings And her formal language style aids this illusion of stepping back in time She doesn t apologize for tough vocabulary, either This makes the bookchallenging to read, but sixth graders should handle it with ease

  4. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here HATE HATE HATE HATE HATE To clarifyHATED IT Ok so I was willingtotally willing to give this dumb book a chance, what do I get THIS The kid got sick and because in that time there were very little cures for anything, especially serious illnesses, the kid is now a cripple He is a brat The book clearly states that I can t remember whether directly or indirectly But ANYHOW he is such a brat that he scares away anybody and everybody willing to help him or care for himOh yha and h HATE HATE HATE HATE HATE To clarifyHATED IT Ok so I was willingtotally willing to give this dumb book a chance, what do I get THIS The kid got sick and because in that time there were very little cures for anything, especially serious illnesses, the kid is now a cripple He is a brat The book clearly states that I can t remember whether directly or indirectly But ANYHOW he is such a brat that he scares away anybody and everybody willing to help him or care for himOh yha and his parents are important people so their off helping with a war effort Oh did I mention there was a war I m pretty sure there was a war The kid wanted so bad to fight in the same war his daddy was figting in so he was REALLY frustrated at being bed ridden After everybody had fled the house in terror he realized he coudn t do anything OOPS He s helpless What does he do now Why he waits for a creepy monk named John to take pity on him A bunch of stuff happens and the kid is now at the monistary and is learning how to read, carve, write, and best of all, hobble Yup Our poor little cripple is now on crutches AND swimming So after all this happens the kid wants to see his dad since he s been writing letters and his dad says it s ok for him to come up John go in the wynd I m not kidding and some crazy dude that plays a harp go on a trip So after all their scary adventures and avoiding being killed on the way to their destination they FINALLY get there So then there is a ambush AFTER their in the castle type place Everybody s going crazy Theirs fog and no one knows where their coming from So the kid takes it UPON HIMSELF Brave kid you got siralso slightly stupid to go to his friend about 5 miles away and tell him about the attack so they can save the day So this little 10 year old is waling around in crutches in the fogmaybe heading straight towards a attack No matter He avoids all THAT and gets there safe and sound He saves the day Says a friendly hi to his parents And gets congratalations from the King What a couple months Kid, you must me tired What can I get you Oh your fine Oh you already got a medal Well ok then Let me know if you need anything Quietly walks away from the house while accidently dropping a lit cigerette So basically this book has everything Bad writing, a stupid character, boring plot, creepy characters Whatcould you ask for The moral of this review DON T BOTHER Sentiments brought to you by your friendly neighborhood book worm

  5. says:

    How have I never read this before IT S ABSOLUTELY DARLING Also, my edition is gorgeous and the illustrations yeth, I am becoming very cover judgy, also yeth literally everything I ve read this year has been from my library haul so I CAN AFFORD TO BE.

  6. says:

    I had to read this and do a book report on it in 5th grade approximately I remember it being the most dry, torturous book I d read up to that point I wonder what I d think of it now

  7. says:

    This is a sweet and simple story of triumph over adversity in a time when answers to illness were rare, wars were plenty and commitment to duty often meant great sacrifice Lots of hard lessons for a ten year old to learn in any time period and in any culture, but Robin learns his lessons well and in believable ways The author is almost prosaic in her use of language as the story flows with a lovely rhythm and meter throughout Robin s adventures Her mastery of the medieval language structure a This is a sweet and simple story of triumph over adversity in a time when answers to illness were rare, wars were plenty and commitment to duty often meant great sacrifice Lots of hard lessons for a ten year old to learn in any time period and in any culture, but Robin learns his lessons well and in believable ways The author is almost prosaic in her use of language as the story flows with a lovely rhythm and meter throughout Robin s adventures Her mastery of the medieval language structure and use of vocabulary isn t cumbersome at all, and after the first few pages, the flow of the entire piece helps the reader over some of the unfamiliar terms Both Robin s voice and the voice of Brother Luke are consistent throughout We see Robin grow and mature through his use of words and how he handles each new wall he s presented with A quick read for the most part, while a challenge to quickly get a handle on the time period and the culture Wonderful lessons throughout

  8. says:

    Read it for the first time let someone borrow it before I finished That was a mistake Even though I ve heard complaints that nothing happens in this little book, I couldn t wait to continue reading it The prose is lovely, and transported me to medieval England for a spell Looking forward to reading it again next year when my oldest will have it as an assigned reading Read it for the first time let someone borrow it before I finished That was a mistake Even though I ve heard complaints that nothing happens in this little book, I couldn t wait to continue reading it The prose is lovely, and transported me to medieval England for a spell Looking forward to reading it again next year when my oldest will have it as an assigned reading

  9. says:

    I just picked this up to reread for the first time since childhood, and found it didn t live up to my memories for one thing, I found it quite stilted this time around but I m keeping it at four stars for how much I liked it at the time Back then, I thought the book was lovely and wise I also thought that pretty much anything with a Medieval setting was inherently good, and even this time around I enjoyed the parts about the monastery, and learning to read, whittle and swim against a backgro I just picked this up to reread for the first time since childhood, and found it didn t live up to my memories for one thing, I found it quite stilted this time around but I m keeping it at four stars for how much I liked it at the time Back then, I thought the book was lovely and wise I also thought that pretty much anything with a Medieval setting was inherently good, and even this time around I enjoyed the parts about the monastery, and learning to read, whittle and swim against a background of the daily offices of monastic life That was the part I remembered from childhood the exciting part in the second half about the besieged castle I d completely forgotten The book is also an interesting take on disability, view spoiler and it surprises me a little that although it has a happy ending, de Angeli doesn t give Robin a full recovery, which is something that probably impressed the Newbery committee hide spoiler

  10. says:

    Huh Most old award winners are different from modern books, but interesting anyway This one, I can see why it didn t fly with those kids today A somewhat wooden set of characters, lots of moral lessons, and odd perhaps inaccurate historical detail never let anyone tell you history doesn t change I spent most of the read trying to decide what was really wrong with Robin polio and enjoying the illustrations I have liked other books by deAngeli but I m not sure what made this deserve t Huh Most old award winners are different from modern books, but interesting anyway This one, I can see why it didn t fly with those kids today A somewhat wooden set of characters, lots of moral lessons, and odd perhaps inaccurate historical detail never let anyone tell you history doesn t change I spent most of the read trying to decide what was really wrong with Robin polio and enjoying the illustrations I have liked other books by deAngeli but I m not sure what made this deserve the 1950 Newbery Award.ETA I see it won because of the portrayal of a child unbeaten by a disability And I am right, the derivation of window is not from the English words wind hole but instead that is a meaning of the word that turned into the English window Phew

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