The Private Life of Chairman Mao MOBI Â The Private

The Private Life of Chairman Mao MOBI Â The Private
  • Paperback
  • 736 pages
  • The Private Life of Chairman Mao
  • Li Zhisui
  • English
  • 09 October 2018
  • 0679764437

The Private Life of Chairman Mao❮Reading❯ ➸ The Private Life of Chairman Mao ➰ Author Li Zhisui – Essayreview.co.uk From until Mao Zedong s death years later Dr Li Zhisui was the Chinese ruler s personal physician For most of these years, Mao was in excellent health thus he and the doctor had time to discuss poli Fromuntil Mao Zedong s deathyears later Dr Li Life of PDF ´ Zhisui was the Chinese ruler s personal physician For most of these years, Mao was in excellent health thus he and the doctor had time to discuss political and personal matters Dr Li recorded many of these conversations in his diaries, as well as in his memory In this book, Dr Li vividly reconstructs his extraordinary time with Chairman The Private PDF/EPUB or Mao.


About the Author: Li Zhisui

Chinese physician who was the personal physician confidant Life of PDF ´ of Chairman Mao Zedong Li received his medical degree from the West Union University Medical School in Sichuan province in five years later was named director of the private medical facility that treated China s top leaders Beginning in , when Mao chose Li as his personal physician, the two men began to develop a close relationship that The Private PDF/EPUB or lasted until Mao s death in During those years, Li compiled a series of diaries Following Mao s death, Li held several medical posts before joining his two sons in the USA in Li s biography of Mao honored the memory of his late wife, who had urged her husband to share his knowledge with the rest of the world Relying partly on memory some Private Life of MOBI ó diaries were deliberately destroyed during the perilous Cultural Revolution , Li set forth a detailed account of the man he had served for years The book, which was banned in China as slanderous but became a best seller in English several other languages, also provided important details, previously unknown, about many of Mao s colleagues of pivotal events that occurred during Mao s rule.


10 thoughts on “The Private Life of Chairman Mao

  1. says:

    Li Zhisui served as a personal physician to Mao Zedong for twenty two years And yet he doesn t have much to say in his 700 odd page memoir that could be considered worthwhile.Zhisui in fact warns the reader in the introduction about his political naivety, so there s that And it also doesn t help that he wrote this memoir entirely by recollecting the incidents from memory Zhisui actually comes off as a reluctant memoirist, which I consider unforgivably oxymoronic For example, he finds sex to Li Zhisui served as a personal physician to Mao Zedong for twenty two years And yet he doesn t have much to say in his 700 odd page memoir that could be considered worthwhile.Zhisui in fact warns the reader in the introduction about his political naivety, so there s that And it also doesn t help that he wrote this memoir entirely by recollecting the incidents from memory Zhisui actually comes off as a reluctant memoirist, which I consider unforgivably oxymoronic For example, he finds sex to be a really offensive subject and so, he shies away from it as much as he can at every turn He says that he was never interested in politics, but then he rants endlessly about the piddling conflicts perennially happening between Mao s bodyguards and nurses What he should have said for accuracy s sake was that he was not interested in state politics He was all for inconsequential office politics In other words, he was apathetic to things that mattered, but not to those that did not, which makes this book as interesting as a 700 page long doctor s prescription, where he dedicatesthan half of the pages to write about men of Mao s inner security circle and their petty politics to earn Mao s favor, or in most cases, to avoid his wrath Though, he begins the first chapter interestingly enough with Mao s death Zhisui candidly talks about his lack of knowledge about the embalming process, and how, due to that, at one time Mao s face becomes bloated to almost double its size due to the injection of excessive embalming fluid At the least, that is one little, interesting tidbit you won t find anywhere else except in Zhisui s book What little I did learn from this book was that Mao was some sort of half nudist he seldom wore enough clothes , who never washed, never brushed his teeth Zhisui used to remove layers of plaque from his teeth twice a year or left his bed for a considerable amount of time He also liked to seduce young and innocent girls and knowingly used to infect them with a venereal disease he carried He only used to take sponge baths, occasionally Only time he ever got himself immersed fully in water was when he decided to swim in a river for hours on end to show his manliness no wonder the river dolphins went extinct But what I consider his biggest mistake is that he missed a really good opportunity to provide us a peek into the mind of one of the worst dictators the world has ever seen You see, Mao liked Li And so he used to talk with Li frequently from midnight till dawn Only if Zhisui would have been kind enough to tell us what actually they talked about Not once does he feels inclined enough to recount any of the countless conversations he had had with Mao He would just say something like, We talked till dawn and then I returned to my whatever This book should be re titled The Petty Internal Politics of Chairman Mao s Bodyguards

  2. says:

    Wow This man is insane Forget the failed economic policies Forget 30 million people killed some say 60 million and I ve even heard 90 million as a result of his tyranny Forget the underground city he built This man s private life isinsane His insanity seemed quite contagious as the book starts out with the author in charge of preserving the man s corpse with pressure from other high officials This was immediately hilarious as you read about Mao s face falling off and his body beco Wow This man is insane Forget the failed economic policies Forget 30 million people killed some say 60 million and I ve even heard 90 million as a result of his tyranny Forget the underground city he built This man s private life isinsane His insanity seemed quite contagious as the book starts out with the author in charge of preserving the man s corpse with pressure from other high officials This was immediately hilarious as you read about Mao s face falling off and his body becoming bloated Preserving a leader s corpse for further senseless worship is just the beginning to the book s hilarity Don t expect any 20th century Chinese history as the author in this book was not in a position to learn about what was going on throughout the country except through Mao who was a horrible source for that sort of information For example, the author was surprised when Mao told him, Good news, we liberated our brothers in Tibet This may fall under the category of sick humor if you have read anything about the brutal Chinese takeover of Tibet It s harder to find a bookinsightful to the potential madness power can create Also, this book satisfies curiousity of those who know of Mao s policy and want to know what the hell were officials thinking, or how someone could be so heartless as well as stupid to implement these plans The author exposes the inner politics of Beijing and the political logic of Mao Last, this book shows how people became so obsessed with this figure I don t think there is another book that digs as deep and exposes so much of a historical figure Maybe Mao s rule is less a product of political ideology butof Chinese culture Mao, according to The Private Life, modeled himself after Chinese emperors especially the nut Qin Shi Huang, who ordered the construction of the beginning of the great wall and the terracotta warriors

  3. says:

    This book was written by Mao s private doctor published in 1994 before Li s death in 1995 It s about his experiences with one of the most important figures in modern world hiustory All readers must question if it is accurate or unbiased I did as well My answer is that I just don t know However, Li was certainly Mao s doctor during the years presented 1954 1976 , and on a high level of the Zhongnanhai inner circle The photos, as well as his intimate experiences, convey little doubt at l This book was written by Mao s private doctor published in 1994 before Li s death in 1995 It s about his experiences with one of the most important figures in modern world hiustory All readers must question if it is accurate or unbiased I did as well My answer is that I just don t know However, Li was certainly Mao s doctor during the years presented 1954 1976 , and on a high level of the Zhongnanhai inner circle The photos, as well as his intimate experiences, convey little doubt at least to me of his close access to Mao Whatever Li s personal or political motives were to write this book are beyond my ability to discern.Born in Beijing 1919, Dr Li was with Mao for over 22 years They shared meals and details of their personal lives It s probably one of the closest pictures of the Chairman you can get without having been there yourself Undoubtedly there are other accounts written in Chinese I cannot access For anecdotes about Mao, conversations, travel accommodations, sexual habits and hygiene, addictions to cigarettes and sleeping pills, it is a convincing primary source Mao was a rebel, and Li was a true believer from initial employment with Mao until his gradual disillusionment Li trained in Australia and later emigrated to the USA.Although Mao espoused Chinese traditional medicine, he chose western trained doctors for his personal care Li produced a clear portrait of his former employer from a few years after Mao s ascension until his death If you are interested in Mao as a man, you cannot forego reading this It is exciting as well as terrifying From Mao s disastrous economic Great Leap Forward in agriculture and industry 58 62 to his manipulation of fourth wife Jiang Qing to attack foes during the Cultural Revolution 66 76 , this is strong material You will also learn how Mao liked his food cooked spicy, Hunan style mm mm good.So why did Li write this book It is said that Mao s wife Jiang accused Li of poisoning her in 1968, a scary predicament It is known Li left for the USA shortly after Mao died in 1979 He helped to preserve Mao s body, which is still displayed in a mausoleum on Tiananmen Square Li was an early convert to communism, but later changed his mind based on the events around him He came to be frightened by his proximity to Mao s absolute power and ruthlessness, and burned his notebooks during the later years It s an important account that will continue to be referenced by authors in the future, as it has been in the past

  4. says:

    In 2009, I read a digital edition of Traditional Chinese of this book which was sent by a net pal who was in Honkong at the time He, the author mentioned that when Mao was dying, his dick was green, which just gave a hint that Mao might ve died of VDWhy couldn t an emperor be impotent He d been fucking and murdering all his life, right So it wouldn t be weird if the King of Chinkland might die of sexual causes to be continued

  5. says:

    This is one of the best China books I ve read and I ve read about 50 of them It s long and very involved, but written in a clear and fluid style It is, quite simply, fascinating brimful with interesting episodes and tidbits impossible to find anywhere else Details about Mao s illnesses, drug addictions, sex life, and death are particularly salient, while figures and topics you can find in nearly any China book Jiang Qing, Lin Biao, the Cultural Revolution, the Great Leap Forward, etc are This is one of the best China books I ve read and I ve read about 50 of them It s long and very involved, but written in a clear and fluid style It is, quite simply, fascinating brimful with interesting episodes and tidbits impossible to find anywhere else Details about Mao s illnesses, drug addictions, sex life, and death are particularly salient, while figures and topics you can find in nearly any China book Jiang Qing, Lin Biao, the Cultural Revolution, the Great Leap Forward, etc are presented in a whole new light Penned by an erudite and Western educated man who saw and spoke with the chairman nearly every day he was in power, the Private Life of Chairman Mao isengaging than most standard Mao biographies, which is, of course, because it is a first hand, behind the scenes account It may take you a while to get through it, and you may wish to supplement it with one of those standard biographies, but if you ve got a bit of mental stamina or consider yourself a serious China watcher, this narrative is a must

  6. says:

    I borrowed this book from a hotel library in Playa del Carmen last summer I just finished it today I relished it I see so many of the behaviors described here reenacted in our current cultural wars, especially among my liberal brethren The same obsession with ideological purity, the same appetite for purges, for branding as a counterrevolutionary whoever does not toe the line The word has changed, though, and been substituted by many others I ll leave it to you, kind reader, to figure I borrowed this book from a hotel library in Playa del Carmen last summer I just finished it today I relished it I see so many of the behaviors described here reenacted in our current cultural wars, especially among my liberal brethren The same obsession with ideological purity, the same appetite for purges, for branding as a counterrevolutionary whoever does not toe the line The word has changed, though, and been substituted by many others I ll leave it to you, kind reader, to figure out which ones I mean.Mao, like Fidel, like Hitler, like Franco, like Mussolini, was a big child coddled by childish and frightened masses And as incompetent, self indulgent, megalomaniac, and arrogant as the rest of them Dr Zhisui narrates the gradually unfolding nightmare of a 1984 ish totalitarian dystopia where dissent, in deed, word, and thought, was proscribed, and where friendships, casual support, and tenuous social ties were minutely tallied and recorded to better recompense, or punish, members of the party A scenario of crippling claustrophobia that reached its climax during the hysterical Cultural Revolution.Lady Macbeth is a nun in a convent compared to the stifling, ambitious, venomous Jiang Qing, a character that will stay with me against my will, like one of those terrible songs that play in a loop in your brain and slowly drive you insane.Next up, Jung Chang s Mao The Untold Story

  7. says:

    This book is flawed in many respects First, its author is an admitted naif as re politics, history, psychology etc Although he delves into such perspectives, he doesn t get much beyond the surface Second, as he also admits, his class background was bourgeois, his exposure to the lives of ordinary Chinese only coming late in his career Third, he only entered the scene late, after the revolution Fourth, having burned his original notes, his memoir is based on memory.All of those consideration This book is flawed in many respects First, its author is an admitted naif as re politics, history, psychology etc Although he delves into such perspectives, he doesn t get much beyond the surface Second, as he also admits, his class background was bourgeois, his exposure to the lives of ordinary Chinese only coming late in his career Third, he only entered the scene late, after the revolution Fourth, having burned his original notes, his memoir is based on memory.All of those considerations notwithstanding, I found this lengthy account a page turner While only skimming the major events of the period of the late forties to the mid seventies, it did serve as a welcome refresher The medical details are, of course, invaluable, given the author s expertise and privileged position The personal details about the Chinese leadership and the politics of their court were intriguing The whole thing came across, for me at least, as a meditation about how power can corrupt.Although publicity for this book seems to emphasize Mao s sex life, Dr Li really doesn t offer any purient detail He found itoffensive than interesting

  8. says:

    The green dicked Maowhen he died

  9. says:

    Damn It Feels Good To Be A Dictator I liked House of Cards, but I love this book Breathtaking power struggles filled to the brim.It would not be a cake walk for a non Chinese to fully appreciate this book, but it should definitely be no harder to read than the Lord of the Rings Only the traitorstraitorous and monstersmonstrous And upon finishing this book, the reader would finally truly fully understand why the Ring, or Power in this book, is so PRECIOUS.It s easy to take the mora Damn It Feels Good To Be A Dictator I liked House of Cards, but I love this book Breathtaking power struggles filled to the brim.It would not be a cake walk for a non Chinese to fully appreciate this book, but it should definitely be no harder to read than the Lord of the Rings Only the traitorstraitorous and monstersmonstrous And upon finishing this book, the reader would finally truly fully understand why the Ring, or Power in this book, is so PRECIOUS.It s easy to take the moral high ground and pass judgement on Mao here, but I think I could easily have done worse had I had held the Ring myself

  10. says:

    If Mao were still alive, this book would have cost the author his life But Mao died in 1976, this book was published in 1994, and the author himself died a year later During Mao s reign an estimated 50 million Chinese perished from persecution, hunger and disease He was a bad leader in that sense, but is still revered in China at least officially for he is considered the founding father of modern China, no matter how much death and suffering he had caused to his own people The author was M If Mao were still alive, this book would have cost the author his life But Mao died in 1976, this book was published in 1994, and the author himself died a year later During Mao s reign an estimated 50 million Chinese perished from persecution, hunger and disease He was a bad leader in that sense, but is still revered in China at least officially for he is considered the founding father of modern China, no matter how much death and suffering he had caused to his own people The author was Mao s personal physician for 22 years This is a tell all memoir of his life as such and here he revealed all the vileness of the Chairman, his lust for power, his paranoia, lack of empathy and his general wicked nature Indeed, Mao s only virtue, if one may consider it as a virtue, was his ability to acquire and keep power That was his greatness All the rest belongs to the sewer.One can indeed already get a hint of what kind of person he was by the fact that his very own personal physician, who enjoyed his favour for man years, and who was bound by secrecy under the doctor patient privilege, would write this 600 plus page exposition of things Mao had kept top secret during his lifetime Things like that he never, EVER, took a bath that his genitals were never washed that he never brushed his rotting teeth and that he was so sexually promiscuous, with preference over young handsome men and women, that he would take them all to bed simultaneously in an orgy.It was a life well live, by the standards of dictators

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *