The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a

The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a
    The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a Less is It is the idea that, rather than throwing multiple subjects at students and burying them under a mountain of unconnected disciplines, educators should instead employ an integrated focus on a few important core disciplines and related subject areasThe best education, Campbell points out, is simple but deep."/>
  • Paperback
  • 184 pages
  • The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a Classical Education
  • Andrew A. Campbell
  • English
  • 24 March 2019
  • 1930953712

The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a Classical Education➸ [Reading] ➺ The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a Classical Education By Andrew A. Campbell ➭ – Essayreview.co.uk Andrew Campbell s new book, The Latin Centered Curriculum, gives teachers and parents an interesting and easy to read guide explaining classical education, how it came about, and who its major exponen Andrew Campbell s new book, The Latin Centered Curriculum: A eBook ↠ Curriculum, gives teachers and parents an interesting and easy to read guide explaining classical education, how it came about, and who its major exponents are In addition to a useful scope and sequence for how a Latin centered classical education can be accomplished in a home or private school, Campbell explains why the central principle behind classical education is the study of Latin and GreekCampbell provides a short history of the modern classical movement, examines the The Latin-Centered eBook ò predominant role of Latin in a classical education, and explains how the other pieces of the classical curriculum fit together He provides the practical application to Tracy Lee Simmons statement that a Classical education is a curriculum grounded upon Greek, Latin, and the study of civilization from which the arose In addition to chapters on Latin, Greek, and logic, Campbell covers the various content areas of classical education, such as English studies, classical studies, Christian and modern studies, with sections on arithmetic, science, and mathematicsBut Latin-Centered Curriculum: A PDF Å this is far from a purely theoretical book In a chapter entitled, Scope and Sequence, he gives a practical overview of what a Latin based classical curriculum looks like from Kindergarten to th grade With helpful charts and explanations, this book constitutes a manual for the Christian educator who wants a complete understanding of what is involved in a classical educationThe most important section in the book, may well be the chapter titled Multum non Multa This is the principle sometimes expressed by the maxim, Less is It is the idea that, rather than throwing multiple subjects at students and burying them under a mountain of unconnected disciplines, educators should instead employ an integrated focus on a few important core disciplines and related subject areasThe best education, Campbell points out, is simple but deep.


About the Author: Andrew A. Campbell

Librarian Note There isthan one author in the Curriculum: A eBook ↠ Goodreads database with this name.


10 thoughts on “The Latin-Centered Curriculum: A Homeschooler's Guide to a Classical Education

  1. says:

    Excellent Rigorous and flexible classical curriculum Clarified the history and goals a classical vs neo classical education Charlotte Mason has my heart but this was compatible and contributed to the great conversation Recommend

  2. says:

    I re read this book every year It s short, and helps me to remember that education is lighting a fire, not filling a bucket can t remember who said that, but it s true.This book focuses on simplicity both in the curriculum book choices and the schedule I prefer the first edition, as it relieson living books I love how the author includes music in the daily schedule, and the 1 hour of family reading, plus 30 60 minutes of silent reading for each child But the best part of the book I re read this book every year It s short, and helps me to remember that education is lighting a fire, not filling a bucket can t remember who said that, but it s true.This book focuses on simplicity both in the curriculum book choices and the schedule I prefer the first edition, as it relieson living books I love how the author includes music in the daily schedule, and the 1 hour of family reading, plus 30 60 minutes of silent reading for each child But the best part of the book is its calming influence when I am overwhelmed by all the possibilities for homeschoolers I need to be reminded quality, not quantity , and that I don t have to teach everything formally

  3. says:

    I read the first edition Campbell s argument effectively fleshed out why I would NOT follow this pedagogy I ve been long convinced of the value of studying the Latin and Greek roots of English and the merits of being familiar with the great philosophers and the Greco Roman contribution to Western Culture But I cannot venerate it to the exclusion of of math and science, nonwestern culture, and modern classic literature Latin can stretch the mind, but so does math and physics I appreciate the I read the first edition Campbell s argument effectively fleshed out why I would NOT follow this pedagogy I ve been long convinced of the value of studying the Latin and Greek roots of English and the merits of being familiar with the great philosophers and the Greco Roman contribution to Western Culture But I cannot venerate it to the exclusion of of math and science, nonwestern culture, and modern classic literature Latin can stretch the mind, but so does math and physics I appreciate the mantra multum non multa not many things, but much Ironically, Campbell s plan would complicate our homeschool, and frankly, drain the joy from it

  4. says:

    Education is one of my main interests, and over time I ve read a vast number of books and articles about various philosophies and methods of education and developed my own sense of how I d like to pursue it in my family Because I tend to be a strategic big picture sort of person, I have a vision for how the parts of various philosophies and methods can work together into a great education for my kids, but I have long struggled with how to begin If I want my child taking Latin AP exams in high Education is one of my main interests, and over time I ve read a vast number of books and articles about various philosophies and methods of education and developed my own sense of how I d like to pursue it in my family Because I tend to be a strategic big picture sort of person, I have a vision for how the parts of various philosophies and methods can work together into a great education for my kids, but I have long struggled with how to begin If I want my child taking Latin AP exams in high school, how do I get there from here If I want my high schoolers studying humanities history, government, literature, art, etc in an integrated and in depth way, what do I teach them in kindergarten That is why The Latin Centered Curriculum was such a revelation for me, has catapulted into the top spot as my new favorite book on education, and will be one of my top picks for 2011 This book is enormously helpful and useful, containing not only the reasons for a language based classical curriculum, but concrete, year by year suggestions for scope and sequence, goals, and age appropriate curricula in various subjects.As with many other books on classical education, this one begins with an explanation of what the author means by classical if you have read much in the genre you ve probably realized that people mean a zillion different things when they say classical education and why you would want that for your child The Latin Centered Curriculum focuses on the importance of laying a strong foundation in classical languages and implementing the concept of Multum non Multa, which means not many things, but much or, in other words, pursuing a depth of knowledge rather than a large amount of superficial knowledge.The book provides answers to common objections for Latin and classical study, and offers reasons for pursuing it from a utilitarian, cultural, and formative perspective If you re not sure about the reasoning behind studying ancient languages, this section would be helpful for you and I think it spersuasively and simply laid out than similar sections in other books You should know that the classical education discussed in this book is not the Learn some Latin so you understand the roots of English words and read a lot of Great Books version espoused by some other classical proponents The author takes no issue with the Great Books style of neo classical education, he just thinks that the best foundation for that is laid with studying Latin and Greek for the sake of developing intellectual capacity, reasoning skills, and ability to use language.The most valuable part of the book, however, is the age specific discussions of how to implement a classical curriculum beginning in kindergarten Most of the books I ve read are good at imparting vision, but fairly weak on how to implement it The Latin Centered Curriculum, however, covers year by year practical suggestions for English Studies in primary years that encompasses phonics, nursery rhymes and tales, copywork, and recitation , Latin, Classical Studies, Christian Studies, Modern Studies, Arithmetic, and Science I loved seeing the progression of how you could study manageable amounts of things year by year and get to fantastic proficiency by the end of high school.This book really helped me to crystallize my plan for language study in the primary years and gave me confidence I haven t found another book that tracks so closely with my own ideas about education including rigorous language study, interacting with ideas deeply rather than just superficial facts, using Charlotte Mason type ideas about short lessons and narration, and studying humanities in a fully integrated way.Since everyone has their own approach to education, I m sure The Latin Centered Curriculum would behelpful to some people than others, but I would highly recommend it Readof my reviews at A Spirited Mind

  5. says:

    I really enjoyed this bookI ve been reading and rereading it over the last 2 months Its given me fresh inspiration for a classical educationand I have started to implement some of its suggestions in our curriculum If there is one area that I can t get on board with, its in the area of science I can t get behind the notion of focusing mainly on nature studies for science until Grade 9 In this day and environment, I truly believe that a lack of STEM focused studies would be a great disse I really enjoyed this bookI ve been reading and rereading it over the last 2 months Its given me fresh inspiration for a classical educationand I have started to implement some of its suggestions in our curriculum If there is one area that I can t get on board with, its in the area of science I can t get behind the notion of focusing mainly on nature studies for science until Grade 9 In this day and environment, I truly believe that a lack of STEM focused studies would be a great disservice Why can t we have all of the benefits of a classical education but ALSO integrate STEM a bit or a lot

  6. says:

    This book was exactly what I needed Basically just a year by year, blow for blow account of a Latin and Greek centered classical homeschooling experience.Awesome I could do without the bible studies, but I expect that shit from homeschoolers, so I forgive them.

  7. says:

    This is an incredibly helpful resource on classical education He gives a solid history of education, discusses the philosophy behind it, and then helps sort out curriculum and scheduling, both practical issues I appreciated his repeated emphasis on multum non multa, not many things but much.

  8. says:

    I assumed there would be some overlap in recommendations between this book and The Well Trained Mind and there were , but there was plenty of new insight in this little book It looks like I ve already been applying some of his recommendations without knowing it, too

  9. says:

    I m impressed by this second edition of The Latin Centered Curriculum In this book, Andrew Campbell has provided a good introduction to the classical education model and proposed a well detailed curriculum It s thoroughness and level of detail is comparable to Laura Berquist s The Well Trained Mind, without following the neoclassical stages of learning model Instead, Campbell is doggedly faithful to the principle of not many but much or quality over quantity , encouraging many informal e I m impressed by this second edition of The Latin Centered Curriculum In this book, Andrew Campbell has provided a good introduction to the classical education model and proposed a well detailed curriculum It s thoroughness and level of detail is comparable to Laura Berquist s The Well Trained Mind, without following the neoclassical stages of learning model Instead, Campbell is doggedly faithful to the principle of not many but much or quality over quantity , encouraging many informal educational activities around a tight formal core of grammar incl lit and history , math and copywork composition.He puts together an ecumenical curriculum, providing a solid religious education plan with higher level options in both Catholic and Protestant readings He s less clear when it comes to middle ages and modern history, where modern Protestant materials can lean anti Catholic and, perhaps, vice versa , though he at least implies that care is needed.I was impressed by his inclusion of and appreciation for the Ignatian method of education Perhaps because of this, he repeatedly references Kolbe Academy course guides and other materials I appreciate the many references, but, then, I m biased as a currenly enrolled Kolbe parent He has a close relationship with Memoria Press and refers to their materials often, as well.Also impressive was a fair handed treatment of the well known Dorothy Sayers speech on The Lost Tools of Learning Campbell neither fawns nor throws the baby out with the bathwater

  10. says:

    Campbell has written a how to guide for those who aspire to the lofty educational vision of Climbing Parnassus I really wanted to love this book, and in fact I did love this book It presents an excellent and ambitious curriculum plan focusing heavily on ancient Greece and Rome one year for each I am just not quite sold on the multum non multa idea of focusing on a few key areas and going deeply into them I don t feel like you have to give up wide for deep I ve incorporated some aspe Campbell has written a how to guide for those who aspire to the lofty educational vision of Climbing Parnassus I really wanted to love this book, and in fact I did love this book It presents an excellent and ambitious curriculum plan focusing heavily on ancient Greece and Rome one year for each I am just not quite sold on the multum non multa idea of focusing on a few key areas and going deeply into them I don t feel like you have to give up wide for deep I ve incorporated some aspects of this curriculum into mine, notably the serious focus on classical languages I also subscribe to the associated email list, and find it very enlightening

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